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Cabbage, Fresh Fennel, and Carrot Slaw

Cabbage, Fresh Fennel, and Carrot Slaw


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Ingredients

  • 1 2 1/2-pound cabbage, quartered, cored, very thinly sliced (about 18 cups)
  • 2 fresh fennel bulbs, trimmed, halved, very thinly sliced (about 3 cups)
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 very large carrot, peeled, coarsely shredded
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Recipe Preparation

  • Combine cabbage, fennel, onion, and carrot in large bowl. Whisk mayonnaise, sour cream, lemon juice, sugar, and hot sauce in medium bowl to blend. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper. Add dressing to cabbage mixture; toss to coat. Season slaw to taste with salt and pepper. Refrigerate at least 1 hour and up to 2 hours, tossing occasionally. Transfer to serving bowl.

Reviews Section

Fennel Cabbage Slaw - Fennel Coleslaw

Fennel Cabbage Slaw is a refreshing change from the same old coleslaw. The one that we all know. Light green and white. It's a classic. But maybe it's time for a change up. Let's talk about colour, for one thing. I am one who loves colourful food, and this slaw delivers. Not only are vivid colours (naturally occurring, of course) beautiful to look at, but they are insanely healthy, as well.


Carrot and Fennel Slaw

I love fennel. It's one of my favourite vegetables. I am a real licorice lover and so I love it's mild licorice taste. It's wonderful braised and roasted, but my favourite way to eat it is raw.

There are two types of fennel. One is grown for it's seeds, which are delicious in sauces, and the other is grown for use as a vegetable, the most common type being Florence Fennel, which has a bulbous base, stalks which closely resemble celery and feathery fronds on top.

Did you know that there are male and female bulbs? The males are taller and more slender with the females being shorter and more bulbous. I like the females myself. Crisp and slightly sweet, fennel is wonderful served raw in salads, and meltingly mellow and soft when braised, roasted or grilled. It goes wonderfully with other crisp vegetables and is most delicious with fish. A whole salmon stuffed with fennel and roasted is absolutely wonderful.

The bulbs should be heavy and white, firm and free of cracks, browning, or moist areas. The stalks should be crisp, with feathery, bright-green fronds. You can keep fennel for a few days in the refrigerator wrapped in plastic, but try not to keep it more than a day or two because the flavor diminishes as it dries out.
I made a delicious slaw yesterday with some fennel that I picked up at the local green grocers at the weekend. I think I'll have the rest of it for my lunch today. This was really good.


*Carrot and Fennel Slaw*

Serves 6
Printable Recipe

This delicious slaw makes a light and refreshing change from regular coleslaw. I use my mandolin to slice the fennel and my box grater to do the carrots. But you could use the slicing and grating discs in a food processor as well, which would make really quick work of it. I love the mustard in the dressing. It adds a lovely bite to it. Adjust accordingly if you don't like things with a bite. Make the dressing first so that the flavours have time to really develop.

1 small to medium sized fennel bulb
3 cups peeled, shredded carrots (about 4 to 5 large carrots)
1/2 cup of minced red onion
1/2 cup chopped fresh coriander (cilantro)
DRESSING:
5 TBS fresh orange juice
1 TBS of White Balsamic Vinegar
2 tsp fresh lemon juice
1 to 1 1/2 tsp dry mustard powder
2 TBS really good quality extra virgin olive oil
1/2 tsp sea salt

Place all the dressing ingredients into a glass jar with a lid, and give it a good shake. Set aside.

Remove the top greens and stalks from the fennel bulb. Save the feathery greens for the slaw. Trim off any bruised or tough pieces. Quarter the bulb and then cut out the core. Shred half of it using a grater, mandolin or food processor. Reserve the other half for another use. You should have about 1 cup of grated vegetable. Place it into a medium sized bowl, along with the carrot, onion, chopped fennel leaves and coriander. Toss together to mix. Just before serving, give the dressing a good shake and pour it over the slaw. Mix well and serve.


Recipe Summary

  • 1/4 small head red cabbage (about 1 pound), shredded
  • 1 large fennel bulb, trimmed, halved, and sliced very thin
  • 2 large carrots, shredded
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced scallion greens (from 2 scallions)
  • 1 teaspoon minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper

In a large bowl, toss together cabbage, fennel, carrots, and scallion greens. In a small bowl, whisk together ginger, orange juice, oil, and vinegar season with salt and pepper. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss to coat completely. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes (or up to 1 1/2 hours). Toss slaw before serving.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 ½ pounds green cabbage, finely shredded
  • 1 red onion, finely shredded
  • 2 carrots, peeled and finely shredded
  • 1 large fennel bulb, finely shredded
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 ½ cups mayonnaise
  • ¾ cup raspberry chardonnay vinegar
  • ¾ cup white sugar
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons dry mustard
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Mix cabbage, onion, carrot, fennel, and parsley in a large bowl.

Whisk mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, oil, mustard, salt, and pepper together in a separate bowl pour over cabbage mixture and toss to coat.

Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until chilled, about 30 minutes.


Coleslaw recipes

Make a shredded carrot and cabbage salad with a creamy dressing, perfect for picnics and barbecues. Try a traditional recipe or a new twist on the classic.

Classic homemade coleslaw

Forget shop-bought versions and make a homemade slaw. It's an ideal side dish for barbecues or to serve with burgers, salads, sandwiches and more

Healthy coleslaw

Get the kids cooking with this simple coleslaw - they'll be keen to eat it if they've helped out

Classic coleslaw

Make an easy classic coleslaw base then tailor it to your tastes. Apple and cheese work well, plus fennel, celeriac, raisins, spring onions or fresh herbs

Celeriac coleslaw

This large, knobbly root vegetable is lovely raw as well as cooked, and wonderful in this French-style coleslaw

Crunchy coleslaw

A healthier take on this classic side salad- replace mayonnaise with natural yogurt and bump up the flavour with mustard and citrus

Cheese & chive coleslaw

Homemade coleslaw makes the perfect accompaniment to a picnic feast, delicious served with crusty rolls and ham

Red cabbage & fennel coleslaw

Liven up weeknight meals and barbecues with this superhealthy side salad

Easy creamy coleslaw

Give this classic side dish of crunchy grated vegetables a healthy makeover with a low-fat mustard mayonnaise dressing

No-cook Asian prawn coleslaw

The easy way to five a day, a simple fresh salad teamed with a tasty tropical smoothie - vitamintastic

Peppery kohlrabi slaw

With crunchy kohlrabi, horseradish and spring greens, this coleslaw is quick enough for everyday, yet unusual enough to impress guests

Sweet & sour rainbow slaw

This fresh, light coleslaw has a tangy citrus dressing with celery, mustard and poppy seeds - a lovely light side for a BBQ spread

Thai carrot slaw

Shred some carrots, peppers and onions, skip the mayo and mix with Asian flavours for a healthy coleslaw

Superhealthy slaw

Coleslaw is a classic, simple side dish and can be made healthier by packing in more veg and omitting mayo

Winter slaw with maple candied nuts

A fresh and crunchy seasonal slaw served with sweet pecans, cashews, almond and peanuts in a sweet, spicy glaze

Spicy mango citrus slaw

This vibrant raw salad with crunchy mooli, cabbage and peppers makes a perfect side dish to Indian-inspired main courses such as tandoori meats

Red cabbage & pickled chilli slaw

Serve this crunchy red cabbage slaw with pickled jalapeño chillies as part of a Mexican feast. If you're making this dish for kids, leave out the chilli and dress with lime juice and a splash of oil


Fennel and Cabbage Slaw

Published: Apr 7, 2014 · Modified: Feb 15, 2021 by Julia Mueller · This post may contain affiliate links.


It wasn't until I started making slaw myself that I began to understand its merit. I never could get on board with mayo-drenched cabbage, but tossing fresh in-season vegetables together with zesty dressing makes for a flavorful, healthful slaw that is utterly addicting. As in I'm-eating-slaw-for-dinner, back-away-from-my-slaw, #slawfordays, I-can't-get-no-slawtisfaction, we're-getting-slawshed sort of addicting.

I'm just going to call a spade a spade: this slaw made me want to date myself. As in pat-myself-on-the-back, dang-I-look-good, who's-that-lady, wine-and-dine-me date myself. I loved how simple yet flavorful and refreshing the recipe turned out to be and was too busy eating it by the forkful to bother putting it on anything. I used Greek yogurt in place of mayonnaise, which gave the slaw a nice creamy tang and kept it light.


If you're new to fennel, no need to be scared! Fennel is a spring vegetable (so get it while the gettin's good!) with a very unique flavor. Both the fennel bulb and seeds have a peppery, anise-like taste, which is delicious in soups, salads, slaw, and stir fry. When you buy fennel, look for a bulb that is firm and very white. Fennel bulbs begin to turn brown as they get older, and while they are still very usable in this state, the freshest bulbs are the hard, white ones. Because fennel is so firm, I like to slice the bulb very thinly when I use it in salads. When fennel is cooked in soup or stir fry, it has a similar consistency to onion and gives a wonderful depth of flavor to a dish.

Fennel slaw is the perfect accompaniment to your springtime meals. It's full of vibrant spring vegetables with tasty dressing and funky fun sesame and poppy seeds. And no mayonnaise! It adds flavor and texture to your burgers, sandwiches, and tacos. But if like me, you have not the patience to actually prepare food upon which to place the slaw, the fork-to-mouth approach works just dandy too.


Red Cabbage Slaw Ingredients

  • Red Cabbage: Similar to green cabbage, but the flavor is a little richer and earthier. I love the color it adds to the dish!
  • Carrot: The carrot adds a nice bit of sweetness and freshness without being overpowering.
  • Lime: I used lime juice and zest in this recipe for a wonderful kick of zing and the acid cuts through the creaminess.
  • Jalapeños: Finely diced jalapeños add a very slight hint of heat, but it's more about their peppery flavor.
  • Sour Cream: Sour cream not only adds the creaminess I love, but it also makes this slaw really light and fresh tasting. Unlike if you used just mayo which can be heavier.
  • Mayonnaise: In my book, no coleslaw is complete with out mayo! I used regular as it is richer in flavor, but you can use low or non-fat if you prefer.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: ACV adds a nice tang and cuts through the thick mayo wonderfully. If you don't have apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar will also work well.
  • Salt and Pepper: Add this to taste. I found I just needed a little pepper, but add both if you prefer it.

4 cool coleslaws that don't use cabbage

Bored with the usual slaws? The mayo-doused number at the deli or your aunt's vinegared version?

Don't fret. We've dug up recipes that get to the root of your problem — which is that cabbage is so 245 years ago. The koolsla recipes the Dutch brought to this country circa 1770 used cabbage. And that's been pretty much the base for coleslaws ever since.

But chefs and culinary pros like to tinker with classic recipes, so they're using beets, kohlrabi, carrots, fennel, celery root. All are sturdy, colorful, flavorful. All have slaw potential.

The fennel slaw served with a roasted fish sandwich at Found Kitchen and Social House in Evanston began with a rethinking of classic coleslaw, explained Nicole Pederson, the restaurant's executive chef and partner.

"We call it a slaw because it's raw vegetables all sliced very thinly," she said. Shaved fennel is mixed with ribbons shaved from different colors of baby carrots. A bit of napa cabbage is added along with pickled onions, and it's finished with lemon juice and olive oil.

What sets these new slaws apart from their salad siblings is the shredded or thinly sliced ingredients, said cookbook author Rick Rodgers, whose recent "The Big Book of Sides" (Ballantine Books), features several slaw recipes, including one that teams kohlrabi with almonds and apples.

He suggests cutting raw vegetables 1/4-inch or sometimes an 1/8-inch thick. "Slices have to be small enough to be tender without cooking."

That thin slicing and crunch from raw vegetables make these updated slaws a perfect accompaniment to so many dishes, summer's grilled meats and fish among them. It's a good way to add a fun texture to a meal, said Pederson: "When they're shredded, they seem so much lighter."

What about dressings? Well, there are no rules. "Except for the fact you have to kind of bow to regional or family preferences," said Rodgers, citing a diner coleslaw popular in New Jersey that marinates all the vegetables in a sweet and sour vinaigrette. "By sweet, I mean they're almost pickled."

Tips from the Pros

Skip the knife: You can use a mandoline or plastic V slicer or a food processor (shredding blade for solid vegetables slicer for irregular vegetables like cabbage) instead, said Rick Rodgers. But stay away from graters: "The typical box grater will make the shreds too fine, and you end up with vegetable puree."

Balance flavors: "I use radish a lot because it's got that heat and brightness to it," said Nicole Pederson. "Put carrot in, and that sweetens it up, rounds it all out. Beets raw are really sweet and delicious, but they have a backbone of earthiness." She may use a mix of beet varieties, such as candy stripes and goldens.

Consider colors: Use the same sensibilities you would to make a side dish look nice, Rodgers said.

Add herbs: "We like to add a lot of fresh herbs right at the end," said Pederson, who's favoring dill and summer savory at the moment.

Shred an apple: "Apple blends in because its texture is softer," said Rodgers. "It is a flavor element that's nondetectable."

Raw beet slaw with fennel, tart apple and parsley

Prep: 25 minutes

Makes: 4 servings

Diane Morgan, author of "Roots," (Chronicle Books) suggests serving this at a barbecue, at brunch with cured salmon or alongside country pate. Use a mandoline or a sharp chef's knife to cut beets into matchsticks. Use disposable surgical gloves, or you'll end up with red hands.

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon each: fresh lemon juice, freshly grated orange zest

1/2 teaspoon each: honey, fine sea salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 medium red beet, 3 to 5 ounces, peeled, cut into matchsticks

1/2 fennel bulb, trimmed, halved lengthwise, cored, cut into matchsticks

1/2 medium crisp tart apple such as Granny Smith, cored, cut into matchsticks

1/2 cup firmly packed chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

In a small bowl, whisk together oil, lemon juice, orange zest, honey, salt and pepper. In a medium bowl, toss together beet, fennel, apple and parsley. Add dressing. Mix gently to coat ingredients evenly. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Remove from refrigerator 30 minutes before serving. Slaw can be made up to 8 hours in advance. Presentation note: If you don't serve immediately and want to prevent the beets from tinting the fennel, keep beets separate (dressed with half the dressing) and mix in right before serving.

Nutrition information per serving: 128 calories, 10 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 9 g carbohydrates, 1 g protein, 386 mg sodium, 2 g fiber

Carrot slaw with miso vinaigrette

Prep: 15 minutes

Makes: 4 servings

Rick Rodgers, author of "The Big Book of Sides," (Ballantine Books) serves this with Asian-style grilled meats, poultry or seafood. He's a fan of miso and writes that it's "one of the most flavor-packed ingredients in my kitchen because a little goes a long way." Miso brings deep umami notes to this.

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 scallion, white and green parts, finely chopped

Freshly ground black pepper

For vinaigrette, process vinegar, miso, soy sauce and garlic in a blender. With machine running, gradually add oil through hole in the lid. Or crush garlic through a garlic press into a medium bowl. Add vinegar, miso and soy sauce whisk until combined. Gradually whisk in oil.

In a food processor fitted with the coarse shredding blade, shred carrots. Do not shred carrots too fine. If your food processor only has a fine shredding disk, use a V-slicer to julienne carrots into strips less than 1/8-inch wide. In a medium bowl, toss together carrots, scallion and vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper. Slaw can be covered and refrigerated up to 8 hours. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Top each serving with a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

Nutrition information per serving: 300 calories, 29 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 11 g carbohydrates, 2 g protein, 512 mg sodium, 3 g fiber


Recipe: Carrot fritters with saffron yoghurt and a fennel, cabbage and sprout slaw

***Rachel Khoo would like to thank all the inspiring people who helped make the Khoollect studio a hive of creativity. Although the Khoollect studio’s doors have now closed, you can keep up with Rachel’s newest adventures on RachelKhoo.com and on Rachel’s Instagram and Facebook pages – and, continue to enjoy the Khoollect website’s stories and recipes, which will remain available.***

A colourful plateful of food that is surprisingly quick to pull together. (Makes six fritters.)

This delicious recipe is part of Khoollect Food Editor Frankie Unsworth‘s Weekend Eats: a waste-free menu for two. Check out Frankie’s delicious menu to get the full weekend recipe collection, and a detailed shopping list that ensures all fresh food is used over two days. Enjoy!

Carrot fritters with saffron yoghurt and a fennel, cabbage and sprout slaw

Preparation Time 15 MINUTES

250g grated carrot (about 3 medium carrots, peeled and grated)

¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper, to taste

3 tbsp olive or rapeseed oil, for frying

extra virgin olive oil, to taste

extra virgin olive oil, to taste

a sprinkling radish sprouts (optional)

In a mixing bowl, place the grated carrot, spices, seasonings and yoghurt. Add the flour and mix together. Add a little more flour if the mixture is still too wet. If it’s manageable, press in your hands to form into 6 equal-sized patties (dust your fingers with the flour to help form the patties). Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and once hot add the patties (do this in batches to avoid crowding the pan). Cook for 5 minutes on each side, until golden on the outside and cooked through (I tend to press them down as they are cooking to make them cook quicker if I’m in a rush.

For the saffron yoghurt, pour the boiling water over the saffron strands and leave to infuse for 5 minutes. In a bowl, mix the yoghurt with the infused water, lemon juice, oil and seasoning to taste. Set aside. At this point, place 250g of the remaining yoghurt it in a muslin cloth and hang it in the fridge over a bowl to catch the drips. Keep the remaining yoghurt to serve on your pancakes tomorrow morning (the hanging yoghurt will be tomorrow night’s pudding).

For the slaw, use a mandolin to very thinly slice the fennel and red cabbage (cut the halves into quarters first and then slice). You want really thin ribbons of both. Dress with the lemon juice, oil and seasoning. Add a few radish sprouts if you have any handy. Serve the carrot fritters with the slaw and dollop the yoghurt over the top. Decorate with a few of the fennel fronds.

Preparation Time 15 MINUTES

250g grated carrot (about 3 medium carrots, peeled and grated)

¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper, to taste

3 tbsp olive or rapeseed oil, for frying

extra virgin olive oil, to taste

extra virgin olive oil, to taste

a sprinkling radish sprouts (optional)

In a mixing bowl, place the grated carrot, spices, seasonings and yoghurt. Add the flour and mix together. Add a little more flour if the mixture is still too wet. If it’s manageable, press in your hands to form into 6 equal-sized patties (dust your fingers with the flour to help form the patties). Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and once hot add the patties (do this in batches to avoid crowding the pan). Cook for 5 minutes on each side, until golden on the outside and cooked through (I tend to press them down as they are cooking to make them cook quicker if I’m in a rush.

For the saffron yoghurt, pour the boiling water over the saffron strands and leave to infuse for 5 minutes. In a bowl, mix the yoghurt with the infused water, lemon juice, oil and seasoning to taste. Set aside. At this point, place 250g of the remaining yoghurt it in a muslin cloth and hang it in the fridge over a bowl to catch the drips. Keep the remaining yoghurt to serve on your pancakes tomorrow morning (the hanging yoghurt will be tomorrow night’s pudding).

For the slaw, use a mandolin to very thinly slice the fennel and red cabbage (cut the halves into quarters first and then slice). You want really thin ribbons of both. Dress with the lemon juice, oil and seasoning. Add a few radish sprouts if you have any handy. Serve the carrot fritters with the slaw and dollop the yoghurt over the top. Decorate with a few of the fennel fronds.

A colourful plateful of food that is surprisingly quick to pull together. (Makes six fritters.)

This delicious recipe is part of Khoollect Food Editor Frankie Unsworth‘s Weekend Eats: a waste-free menu for two. Check out Frankie’s delicious menu to get the full weekend recipe collection, and a detailed shopping list that ensures all fresh food is used over two days. Enjoy!

Carrot fritters with saffron yoghurt and a fennel, cabbage and sprout slaw

In a mixing bowl, place the grated carrot, spices, seasonings and yoghurt. Add the flour and mix together. Add a little more flour if the mixture is still too wet. If it’s manageable, press in your hands to form into 6 equal-sized patties (dust your fingers with the flour to help form the patties). Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and once hot add the patties (do this in batches to avoid crowding the pan). Cook for 5 minutes on each side, until golden on the outside and cooked through (I tend to press them down as they are cooking to make them cook quicker if I’m in a rush.

For the saffron yoghurt, pour the boiling water over the saffron strands and leave to infuse for 5 minutes. In a bowl, mix the yoghurt with the infused water, lemon juice, oil and seasoning to taste. Set aside. At this point, place 250g of the remaining yoghurt it in a muslin cloth and hang it in the fridge over a bowl to catch the drips. Keep the remaining yoghurt to serve on your pancakes tomorrow morning (the hanging yoghurt will be tomorrow night’s pudding).

For the slaw, use a mandolin to very thinly slice the fennel and red cabbage (cut the halves into quarters first and then slice). You want really thin ribbons of both. Dress with the lemon juice, oil and seasoning. Add a few radish sprouts if you have any handy. Serve the carrot fritters with the slaw and dollop the yoghurt over the top. Decorate with a few of the fennel fronds.



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