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2015 Restaurant of the Year: Shaya

2015 Restaurant of the Year: Shaya


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In America, there are restaurants known for serving excellent examples of a certain dish like sushi or steak; there are those that specialize in a certain cuisine, such as Thai or French; and there are those that consistently deliver such a special culinary experience that they are counted among the country’s very best.

Finally, there is an elite group of restaurants whose chefs and menus change the way we think about dining, significantly influencing their guests and colleagues across the nation — and perhaps even around the world.

Of course, it isn’t just about who demonstrates the highest level of skill in the kitchen; we address that in naming our annual Chef of the Year. The holder of that title isn't necessarily the man or woman behind the year’s game-changing restaurant. As The Daily Meal’s editorial director, Colman Andrews, so aptly stated, “We are talking about more than just good or innovative food here. This is about restaurants that mean something, either through demonstrable influence on other places or maybe just because they have gone their own way so firmly that they are inspiring even to those who don't imitate or riff off them.”

This year, we considered 10 restaurants from around the country that we thought best fit this description, looking at reports from our own site and other respected food sites and publications, finding our nominees in metropolises such as Chicago and New York, but also in smaller cities and towns like Cleveland; Clayton, Missouri; and Los Gatos, California. It didn’t matter the size of the restaurant; the sole criterion used while identifying nominees was that the establishments made significant contributions to the American restaurant scene in 2015 and changed the way we thought about dining out in this country.

Once our list was finalized, we asked select members of The Daily Meal Council — including writers, journalists, bloggers, and restaurateurs — who did not have an establishment in the running for the title to either vote for one of the restaurants we had identified, or write in one that we missed but they believed deserved the accolade. We also polled our knowledgeable Daily Meal staff and our passionate city editors from around America.

In the end — just like last year — there was a clear winner and two restaurants that deserved honorable mentions. We proudly present: the Restaurant of the Year for 2015.


Announcing The 2015 Eater Awards For New Orleans

It is time now—drumroll, trumpets, gongs.—to announce the winners of the 2015 Eater Awards. The winners comprise a diverse group of the finest and most interesting chefs, operators, and characters in the continent that have defined this year in dining. We applaud them. You are hereby instructed to applaud them. So, without further ado—actually, a few quick pre-ambling thoughts.

To recap, Eater's local editors nominated candidates for five major local categories: Restaurant of the Year, Chef of the Year, Bartender of the Year, So Hot Right Now Restaurant, and Stone Cold Stunner. Eater readers then voted to narrow the field to a final three in each category. From that final three, the Eater editorial team chose the winner. Our Eater National brain trust then got together to decide the national winners for those categories. In addition to these main stage winners, said Eater editorial team has named worthy winners in more specialized categories, for myriad notable achievements.

Nominees and winners alike will be feted at a party tonight in Manhattan. Those winners that couldn't make it should watch their mail for packages containing cans of Italian peeled tomatoes. And now, without further ado, the winners in New Orleans.

Restaurant of the Year
Nominees: Shaya, Compere Lapin, Brennan's, Angeline, Balise
Finalists: Shaya, Compere Lapin, Brennan's
Winner: Shaya

Chef of the Year:
Nominees: Alon Shaya, Nina Compton, Alex Harrell, Slade Rushing, Lisa White & Kelly Fields
Finalists: Nina Compton, Alex Harrell, Lisa White & Kelly Fields
Winner: Nina Compton

So Hot Right Now
Nominees: Willa Jean, Kin, Red's Chinese, Brown Butter, 1000 Figs
Finalists: Willa Jean, Kin, Brown Butter
Winner: Kin

Bartender of the Year
Nominees: Kimberly Patton Bragg, Nick Detrich, Liam Deegan, Ricky Gomez, T. Cole Newton
Finalists: Liam Deegan, Nick Detrich, Ricky Gomez
Winner: Nick Detrich

Stone Cold Stunner
Nominees: Paladar 511, Brennan's, Salon By Sucre, Avo, Compere Lapin
Finalists: Compere Lapin, Brennna's, Paladar 511
Winner: Brennan's


Related Articles

Yet another Israeli restaurant voted America’s best by major U.S. publication

The great American hummus revolution goes upmarket

Here are six signs that 2015 was the year of Israeli food in America.

1. Israel-born chef Alon Shaya opened an Israeli restaurant, Shaya earlier this year, his third restaurant in New Orleans. By the end of the year he had won the prestigious James Beard award for Best Chef in the South, and his restaurant, with Israeli classics including hummus, ikra, Moroccan carrot salad and fried cauliflower, was named restaurant of the year by the Daily Meal website and best new restaurant by Esquire. This is particularly admirable given that Shaya is in a city with its own well-established and much loved culinary traditions, Creole and Cajun cuisines. Maybe the Big Easy and the laid-back feel of Israel have something in common, not to mention the bold and fresh flavors that both cuisines share.

2. Timna in New York’s East Village, which serves new Israeli-style dishes such as risotto made from freekeh (smoked green wheat) with seared scallops, and Mediterranean tuna sashimi, was voted best new restaurant of the year by readers of USA Today.

Timna Chef Nir Mesika. Michael-Tulipan

3. More Israeli chefs are finally calling their restaurants “Israeli,” as Timna and Shaya are doing, and are no longer hiding behind the categories of Jewish, Middle Eastern or Mediterranean cuisines or declaring themselves “free of culinary or geographic limitations." New York-based chef and restaurateur Einat Admony’s two newest restaurants, Bar Bolonat and Combina are excellent examples of the new unabashed Israeli cuisine that distances itself from the traditional Jewish kitchen and gives it a new and unique interpretation with a chef’s touch and vision.

4. Michael Solomonov's cookbook “Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking” (co-written with Steven Cook) came out in October to rave reviews from every food magazine across the country. The book covers the melting pot that is Israeli cuisine and presents it to American cooks in simple, easy-to-follow recipes with easy-to-find ingredients. Solomonov owns several restaurants in Philadelphia, most notably Zahav, an Israeli restaurant that won many awards. In August 2014 Solomonov opened Dizengoff, an Israeli-style hummus place, or hummusia in Hebrew, that serves hummus and only hummus, with rotating toppings.

5. Hummus was also the choice of Bon Appetit Magazine for the “creamy, dreamy dish of the year." The top culinary magazine based the choice on Solomonov’s mouth watering hummus plates with toppings such as radish, beet-pickled egg and fried chickpeas. This, with a fluffy pita bread on the side, is the dish of the year every year for most Israelis.

6. Zagat prepared a detailed list of “10 Israeli dishes you need to know” (which you probably already know, if you’re reading Haaretz). It includes many of the all-time Israeli favorites such as bourekas, hummus, sabich and shakshuka. And speaking of Shakshuka, the newly popular North African dish made it to the Forbes magazine list of restaurants trends of the year.

Mediterranean sashimi at Nir Mesika's restaurant Timna in New York. Michael Tulipan

Looking ahead to 2016, the future seems bright, with the promise of celebrity chefs well-known in Israel such as Eyal Shani and Meir Adoni intending to open places in NYC.


The 50 Nominees for America's Best New Restaurants 2015 (List)

Every year, we announce the Bon Appétit Hot 10 , our list of America's Best New Restaurants. And it all starts with these 50 nominees. Over the last several months, Andrew Knowlton and Julia Kramer criss-crossed the country seeking out the truly original, innovative, and unexpected cooking taking place right now. These are the spots that killed it this year. The restaurants range from a quintessential French bistro to a place that serves pretty much only hummus, an eclectic brewpub to a vodka-soaked Russian joint. The one thing they have in common is this: flat-out deliciousness. Which ones of these 50 nominees will earn a spot in the Hot 10 ? Check back August 18 to find out.

Click here for the map and photos

Aatxe : San Francisco, CA
Al’s Place : San Francisco, CA
Alimento : Los Angeles, CA
Arcade Bakery : New York, NY
Artisan Meat Share : Charleston, SC
Biscuit Love : Nashville, TN
Cosme : New York, NY
Dai Due : Austin, TX
Damn the Weather : Seattle, WA
The Dining Room at the White Hart Inn : Salisbury, CT
Dizengoff : Philadelphia, PA
Dove’s Lucheonette : Chicago, IL
East Ender : Portland, ME
Gardner : Austin, TX
Gjusta : Los Angeles, CA
The Grey : Savannah, GA
Heyday : Minneapolis, MN
Hola Arepa : Minneapolis, MN
Jon & Vinny’s : Los Angeles, CA
Kachka : Portland, OR
Kindred : Davidson, NC
Krog Street Market : Atlanta, GA
Lazy Bear : San Francisco, CA
Leon’s Oyster Shop : Charleston, SC
Liholiho Yacht Club : San Francisco, CA
Loyal Nine : Cambridge, MA
Luscher’s Red Hots : Dallas, TX
Manolin : Seattle, WA
Milk Glass Mrkt : Portland, OR
Milktooth : Indianapolis, IN
Mission Chinese Food : New York, NY
Momofuku Ko : New York, NY
Parachute : Chicago, IL
Petit Trois : Los Angeles, CA
Porcellino’s : Memphis, TN
The Progress : San Francisco, CA
Rintaro : San Francisco, CA
Rose’s Fine Food : Detroit, MI
Saltine : Jackson, MS
Santina : New York, NY
Semilla : Brooklyn, NY
Shaya : New Orleans, LA
Small Brewpub : Dallas, TX
Southbound : Richmond, VA
Spoon and Stable : Minneapolis, MN
Tandem Coffee + Bakery : Portland, ME
Thip Khao : Washington, DC
Townsend : Philadelphia, PA
Trentina : Cleveland, OH
Trove : Seattle, WA


The New Orleans Restaurant Bounce, After Katrina

NEW ORLEANS — On a brutally humid day almost 10 years ago, Donald Link was a sweaty, desperate man in a respirator mask lugging a rotting pig’s head to the curb.

Unlike nearly 80 percent of New Orleans, his French-influenced restaurant, Herbsaint, hadn’t flooded when the levees failed during Hurricane Katrina. But the pig’s head, along with enough food to fill 50 trash bags, had been putrefying ever since the storm hit three weeks earlier.

The city still felt a lot like an armed camp then. A tour by The New York Times three weeks after Katrina found that most restaurants were closed, save for a few makeshift hotel operations and one brave little diner called Slim Goodies.

Contaminated drinking water, spotty power and not enough workers or customers would keep many of them closed for months, even years. Some never came back. But five weeks after the storm, using paper plates and bottled water, Herbsaint was up and running.

“It seems like forever ago and it seems like it was just yesterday,” Mr. Link said recently. “It scared me to death to think everything I put into Herbsaint was about to be gone and I’d have to start over.”

Now, Mr. Link employs about 300 people and has five restaurants, including Cochon in New Orleans and an outpost of his Cochon Butcher set to open in Nashville in September. Even early on a recent rainy Wednesday, Pêche, the Warehouse District seafood restaurant he opened in 2013 with the chef Ryan Prewitt, was packed.

Mr. Link’s tale is a dramatic one in a city that many doubted could recover. A decade later, few would disagree that the New Orleans dining scene has not only come back, but the city is a much better place to eat than it was even before the storm.

Global influences and a broader Southern canon have found homes on menus that used to be locked in the Creole mandate. The number of restaurants as of 2013 was up by at least 11 percent from 2005, according to the Census Bureau.

Some are small efforts run by an influx of new talent, others are giants developed by Mr. Link and the chef John Besh, who have emerged as the city’s new culinary quarterbacks, in the way Paul Prudhomme, Emeril Lagasse, Frank Brigtsen and Susan Spicer were before them.

But with the revival comes a new debate. Have the developers and true-believer transplants brought with them a brand of gentrification that is diluting the scruffy neighborhoods and odd traditions that make New Orleans a terrific place to eat?

“We had always said our biggest competitors were home cooks,” said Ti Adelaide Martin, a proprietor of the restaurant family that runs Commander’s Palace, where turtle soup, bread pudding and Gulf fish pecan are always on the menu. “Now the whole game is different. These guys just start on a shoestring and go for it and people flock there. It’s just like a big old petri dish of food.”

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Mexican food, particularly regional Mexican cooking, has a niche, albeit a small one. Vietnamese restaurants, which were largely cloistered in New Orleans East and immigrant enclaves on the Mississippi River’s West Bank, have opened in the middle of the city. The cooking style has become such an important part of the city’s palate that it has infused itself into modern menus at both the fanciest restaurants and casual spots like MoPho in Mid-City, where young parents spoon pho into their babies and the bar crowd drinks Sazerac bubble tea cocktails.

The shuffle of post-Katrina cultural influences is just another example of Creole culture expressing itself through food, said David Beriss of the department of anthropology at the University of New Orleans. “Creolization — that way of adapting and being in the world — shows up everywhere,” he said.

The joke used to be that New Orleans is a town of 5,000 restaurants and five recipes. The town still reveres its tradition, but restaurants that have been cooking New Orleans-style Creole dishes for more than 100 years have become sharper.

People point to the new life breathed into Brennan’s in the French Quarter, which went through an expensive family feud and remodeling before it reopened in 2014 with the chef Slade Rushing in the kitchen. Now, a rutabaga cake studded with duck confit is on the menu along with the pompano cooked in butter and crowned with crab meat.

“We are still very much cooking in the vernacular of the South and Louisiana and New Orleans, but it’s broader and not so typical,” Mr. Link said. “Not everything is sweet potato this and bourbon this and tasso that.”

What to Cook Right Now

Sam Sifton has menu suggestions for the week. There are thousands of ideas for what to cook waiting for you on New York Times Cooking.

    • Memorial Day is a chance to celebrate with friends and family. It’s time to grill some chicken, or will hamburgers be on the docket?
    • Melissa Clark has a fine new recipe for grilled merguez on a bed of minty, lemony couscous.
    • Try this spicy red pesto pasta, a pantry dish inspired by pesto alla Siciliana.
    • You could make this terrific crisp tofu katsu with lemon-tahini sauce.
    • And it’s never not a good time to make quick ragù with ricotta and lemon.

    Icons of the classic menu and the people who have cooked them for decades are held up in new, more loving light. “We really have polished some beautiful aspects of the culture we used to take for granted,” said Mr. Besh, who became the national face of the New Orleans restaurant recovery.

    “I would never want to go through it again, good lord, but we’re more progressive in the sense of being more culturally responsible and astute,” he said.

    Mr. Besh had two restaurants when the storm hit. Restaurant August was a softly lavish place of fennel pollen and scallops. Besh Steak was a moneymaker inside Harrah’s casino.

    “It ended up being my saving grace,” he said. “The money from that contract with Harrah’s kept August afloat.”

    Mr. Besh forged a path back, securing federal contracts to feed workers rebuilding the city and working with his most talented chefs to open new restaurants in hotels that offered inexpensive leases. He has since put out four cookbooks and employs more than 1,000 people at 10 restaurants.

    Like Mr. Link, he has become less a culinary presence in his restaurants and more of a coach, allowing chefs who work with him to develop their own concepts. This week, Willa Jean bakery opens in the Central Business District. Kelly Fields, who will be at the helm, was working for Mr. Besh when she evacuated New Orleans. She stayed away for five years and then returned to the Besh fold and eventually ran all his pastry operations.

    In February, the Besh team opened Shaya in the Uptown neighborhood under the direction of Alon Shaya, a native of Israel who worked with Mr. Besh to keep August alive in the early recovery years. Shaya is at the top of the list food writers offer to friends visiting the city, and locals remain starry-eyed over Mr. Shaya’s freshly baked pita and foie gras scented with rose and carob molasses.

    “I would have never thought about opening a modern Israeli restaurant on Magazine Street 10 years ago,” Mr. Besh said.

    Would the city have embraced modern Israeli cooking, which is having its turn in cities like New York and Philadelphia and Los Angeles, even if the storm hadn’t hit? Similarly, would a utilitarian and bohemian neighborhood like Bywater, which barely escaped major flooding, have turned into a hipster food haven that has become the city’s Williamsburg?

    The neighborhood is so much a symbol of the post-Katrina New Orleans that in Los Gatos, Calif., the chef David Kinch is using the name for the casual New Orleans-style restaurant he plans to open this fall down the street from his flagship, Manresa.

    Mr. Kinch, who started his cooking career in New Orleans and returned in July to film “The Mind of a Chef” for PBS, said he left the city because he felt constricted by traditional Creole and Cajun cooking. But now he says young cooks revere it in a way his generation never could.

    With that growth comes a burst of new people into old neighborhoods, pushing up rents and changing the demographics along places like Freret Street and in Mid-City. St. Roch Market is a shiny new food hall developed inside a beleaguered former shop and seafood market just across the street from the Faubourg Marigny (a neighborhood some have started calling the Faux Marigny). The market, which has been criticized for its prices and the politics surrounding its development, employs a lot of people in the neighborhood who might otherwise not have jobs.

    “Is gentrification a good or a bad thing? I think places have to evolve,” said Ms. Spicer, the New Orleans chef who gave Mr. Link his start at Herbsaint in 2000 and became the inspiration for the chef on the HBO series “Treme.” Ms. Spicer and her family lost their home to the floodwaters, but by Thanksgiving she had reopened her French Quarter restaurant, Bayona.

    Reverence for the old has also helped preserve classic neighborhood restaurants, although the neighborhoods themselves have not always fared as well. Willie Mae’s Scotch House, a clapboard house with a bar that for years fed the Seventh Ward batter-dipped fried chicken, was lovingly restored by a band of chefs and volunteers led by the Southern Foodways Alliance.

    A block away, Leah Chase, the most important Creole chef in the country, is still turning out beautiful gumbo and fried chicken at her restaurant, Dooky Chase, which took nearly two years to reopen.

    Taxis drop off culinary tourists at both restaurants almost every day, but the neighborhood is still fragmented, with many of the people who lost their homes to Katrina scattered across the South.

    Mr. Beriss of the University of New Orleans said places like Willie Mae’s and Dooky Chase have been museum-fied, “as kind of a symbol of what New Orleans food linked to race and Creole culture used to be.”

    Brett Anderson, the longtime writer and restaurant critic for The Times-Picayune, disagrees.

    “These are the places that set emotional harpoons in people,” he said over a meal of smoked soft-shell crab at Clancy’s, his favorite neighborhood restaurant Uptown. “The high-style places and places like Dooky’s were dusty. Now they are cherished and better.”

    Mr. Anderson disagrees, as well, with the proposition that New Orleans has grown in ways that make it more like other cities embracing a new wave of food obsession. Newcomers may arrive and find a place here, he said, but the heart of the city remains constant. New Orleans is and always will be New Orleans.

    “So it has Stumptown coffee,” he said. “That doesn’t even come close to making it a hipster city. It just never will be.”


    Celebrating the 2015 James Beard Award Winners

    Christina Tosi taking home the medal for Outstanding Pastry Chef for her work at Momofuku Milk Bar in New York City. Photo courtesy of James Beard Foundation on Instagram.

    Last night, hundres of the best chefs, bakers, mixologists, food writers and restauranteurs in the country gathered in Chicago for the annual James Beard Foundation Awards. These industry awards offer more than insider buzz: The attendees make up a who’s who of American chefs, offer up-and-comers a new platform, and provide the rest of us with delicious dining inspiration.

    We’re excited to congratulate all the nominees, along with the few who brought home medals last night. Here, the winners of this year’s James Beard Awards — also known as your 2015 eating and drinking bucket list.

    The 2015 Restaurant and Chef Awards
    Best New Restaurant, Presented by True Refrigeration®
    Bâtard, NYC

    Outstanding Baker
    Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery, NYC

    Outstanding Bar Program, Presented by Tanqueray No. TEN®
    The Violet Hour, Chicago
    Outstanding Chef, Presented by All-Clad Metalcrafters
    Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern, NYC

    Outstanding Pastry Chef
    Christina Tosi, Momofuku, NYC
    Outstanding Restaurant, Presented by Acqua Panna® Natural Spring Water
    Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, NY

    Outstanding Restaurateur
    Donnie Madia, One Off Hospitality Group, Chicago (Blackbird, Avec, The Publican, and others)

    Outstanding Service, Presented by Goose Island Beer Company
    The Barn at Blackberry Farm, Walland, TN

    Outstanding Wine Program
    A16, San Francisco

    Outstanding Wine, Beer, or Spirits Professional, Presented by BACARDÍ® GRAN RESERVA
    Rajat Parr, Mina Group, San Francisco

    Rising Star Chef of the Year, Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water
    Jessica Largey, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA

    Best Chef: Great Lakes
    Jonathon Sawyer, The Greenhouse Tavern, Cleveland

    Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic
    Spike Gjerde, Woodberry Kitchen, Baltimore

    Best Chef: Midwest
    Gerard Craft, Niche, Clayton, MO

    Best Chef: Northeast
    Barry Maiden, Hungry Mother, Cambridge, MA

    Best Chef: Northwest
    Blaine Wetzel, The Willows Inn on Lummi Island, Lummi Island, WA

    Best Chef: NYC
    Mark Ladner, Del Posto

    Best Chef: South
    Alon Shaya, Domenica, New Orleans

    Best Chef: Southeast
    Jason Stanhope, FIG, Charleston, SC

    Best Chef: Southwest
    Aaron Franklin, Franklin Barbecue, Austin

    Best Chef: West
    Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski, State Bird Provisions, San Francisco

    2015 James Beard Foundation Outstanding Restaurant Design Awards
    75 Seats and Under (For the best restaurant design or renovation in North America since January 1, 2012)
    Design Firm: Bureau of Architecture and Design
    Designers: James Gorski and Tom Nahabedian
    Project: Brindille, Chicago
    76 Seats and Over (For the best restaurant design or renovation in North America since January 1, 2012)
    Design Firm: SOMA
    Designers: Michel Abboud
    Project: Workshop Kitchen + Bar, Palm Springs, CA

    2015 James Beard Foundation America’s Classics, Presented by Brand USA

    Archie’s Waeside, Le Mars, IA
    Owner: Robert Rand

    Beaumont Inn, Harrodsburg, KY
    Owners: Elizabeth and Dixon Dedman, Helen and
    Chuck Dedman

    Guelaguetza, Los Angeles
    Owners: The Lopez Family

    Sally Bell’s Kitchen, Richmond, VA
    Owners: Martha Crowe Jones and Scott Jones

    Sevilla Restaurant, NYC
    Owners: Jose Lloves and Bienvenido Alvarez

    2015 James Beard Foundation Who’s Who of Food & Beverage in America

    Allan Benton
    Pork Producer and Purveyor
    Madisonville, TN

    Dale DeGroff
    Mixologist
    NYC

    Wylie Dufresne
    Chef and Restaurateur
    NYC

    Nathalie Dupree
    Cookbook Author and Television Personality
    Charleston, SC

    Maricel Presilla
    Chef, Restaurateur, and Cookbook Author
    Hoboken, NJ

    2015 James Beard Foundation Humanitarian of the Year
    Michel Nischan
    CEO, President and Co-Founder of Wholesome Wave
    Westport, CT
    2015 James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award
    Richard Melman
    Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises
    Chicago

    2015 James Beard Foundation Book Awards
    American Cooking
    Heritage
    Sean Brock
    (Artisan)

    Baking and Dessert
    Flavor Flours: A New Way to Bake with Teff, Buckwheat, Sorghum, Other Whole & Ancient Grains, Nuts & Non-Wheat Flours
    Alice Medrich
    (Artisan)
    Beverage
    Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail
    Dave Arnold
    (W. W. Norton & Company)

    Cooking from a Professional Point of View
    Bar Tartine: Techniques & Recipes
    Nicolaus Balla and Cortney Burns
    (Chronicle Books)

    Focus on Health
    Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing
    Keith Schroeder
    (Oxmoor House)
    General Cooking
    The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking
    Faith Durand and Sara Kate Gillingham
    (Clarkson Potter)

    International
    Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition
    David Sterling
    (University of Texas Press)
    Photography
    In Her Kitchen: Stories and Recipes from Grandmas Around the World
    Gabriele Galimberti
    (Clarkson Potter)

    Reference and Scholarship
    Butchering Poultry, Rabbit, Lamb, Goat, and Pork: The Comprehensive Photographic Guide to Humane Slaughtering and Butchering
    Adam Danforth
    (Storey Publishing)

    Single Subject
    Bitter: A Taste of the World’s Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes
    Jennifer McLagan
    (Ten Speed Press)
    Vegetable Focused and Vegetarian
    At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well
    Amy Chaplin
    (Roost Books)

    Writing and Literature
    The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food
    Dan Barber
    (Penguin Press)

    Cookbook Hall of Fame
    Barbara Kafka

    Cookbook of the Year
    Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition
    David Sterling
    (University of Texas Press)

    2015 James Beard Foundation Broadcast Media Awards, Presented by Lenox Tableware and Gifts
    Podcast
    The Feed Podcast
    Hosts: Rick Bayless and Steve Dolinsky
    Producers: Matt Cunningham and Steve Dolinsky
    ​Airs on: soundcloud.com/thefeedpodcast

    Radio Show/Audio Webcast
    Hidden Kitchens World
    Producers: The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva)
    Airs on: NPR

    Special/Documentary
    Food Chains
    Host: Forest Whitaker
    Director: Sanjay Rawal
    Producers: Hamilton Fish, Smriti Keshari, Eva Longoria, Sanjay Rawal, and Eric Schlosser
    Airs: iTunes and Netflix

    Television Program, in Studio or Fixed Location
    Martha Stewart’s Cooking School
    Host: Martha Stewart
    Producers: Greta Anthony, Kimberly Miller Olko, Martha Stewart, Calia Brencsons-Van Dyk, and Lisa Wagner
    Airs On: PBS

    Television Program, on Location
    The Mind of a Chef
    Host: Anthony Bourdain
    Producers: Jared Andrukanis, Anthony Bourdain, Joe Caterini, Chris Collins, Michael Steed, and Lydia Tenaglia
    Airs on: PBS

    Television Segment
    CBS This Morning’s “The Dish”
    Host: Anthony Mason and Vinita Nair
    Producers: Brian Applegate, Greg Mirman, and Marci Waldman
    Airs on: CBS

    Video Webcast, Fixed Location and/or Instructional
    ChefSteps
    Host: Grant Lee Crilly and Chris Young
    Producer: Richard B. Wallace
    Airs on: chefsteps.com

    Video Webcast, on Location
    food.curated
    Host: Liza de Guia
    Producer: Liza de Guia
    Airs on: foodcurated.com

    Visual and Technical Excellence
    Wall of Fire: A ChefSteps Story
    Director: Sandy Smolan
    Photographer and Editor: Reva Keller
    Producers: Grant Crilly and Chris Young
    Airs on: chefsteps.com

    Outstanding Personality/Host
    Host: Ina Garten
    Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics
    Airs on: Food Network

    2015 James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards
    Dining and Travel
    The India Issue
    The Editors of Saveur
    Saveur

    Food and Culture
    “The Toxic, Abusive, Addictive, Supportive, Codependent Relationship Between Chefs and Yelpers”
    Rebecca Flint Marx
    San Francisco Magazine

    Food and Health
    “Against the Grain”
    Michael Specter
    The New Yorker

    Food-Related Columns
    “Unearthed”
    Tamar Haspel
    The Washington Post

    Food Coverage in a General-Interest Publication
    GQ
    The Editors of GQ

    Food Politics, Policy, and the Environment
    “The Quinoa Quarrel: Who Owns the World’s Greatest Superfood?”
    Lisa M. Hamilton
    Harper’s with the Food & Environment Reporting Network

    Group Food Blog
    Grub Street

    Home Cooking
    “Cabbage Craft”
    Kathy Gunst
    EatingWell

    Humor
    “Giving & Thanking”
    Ben Schott with the Bon Appétit Editors
    Bon Appétit

    Individual Food Blog
    Orangette
    Molly Wizenberg

    Personal Essay
    “Life in Chains: Finding Home at Taco Bell”
    John DeVore
    Eater

    Profile
    “Élite Meat”
    Dana Goodyear
    The New Yorker

    Visual Storytelling
    “Make”
    Gillian Duffy
    New York

    Wine, Spirits, and Other Beverages
    “Into the Vines”
    Gabrielle Hamilton
    AFAR

    Craig Claiborne Distinguished Restaurant Review Award
    “Artisanal-Everything Roberta’s Defies the Stereotypes,” “Once an Icon, Per Se is Showing its Age,” “Six Reasons Why Cosme is One of NYC’s Most Relevant New Restaurants”
    Ryan Sutton
    Eater

    MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award
    “Life in Chains: Finding Home at Taco Bell”
    John DeVore
    Eater


    A taste of 2015: Recipes, food news highlights

    The past year brought food to the forefront in more ways than one.

    From fabulous new recipes and new restaurants to big changes in the local grocery store landscape, food was big news in 2015. Here’s a quick look back at what the year dished out:

    Local brand bought: Campbell’s Soup made headlines in June when it purchased Ferndale-born and based Garden Fresh Gourmet salsa maker for a staggering $231 million. The iconic soup company pledged to keep Garden Fresh’s commitment to quality and freshness as it joined Campbell’s fresh division. Jack Aronson, the founder of Garden Fresh, was also to stay on an adviser.

    Garden Fresh family finds deal bittersweet but way to grow

    Shakeup on the grocery scene: Metro Detroit said good-bye to the much beloved Hiller’s Markets as the Kroger Company of Michigan bought the chain in May with a deal to reopen and operate all but one store as Kroger. Colorado-based Lucky’s Market opened an Ann Arbor location, offering organic produce, delicious house-cured bacon and house-made breads. A location in Traverse City is in the works, according to www.luckysmarket.com. Fresh Thyme Market, another chain offering lower-priced organics, opened locations in Troy, Northville and Rochester Hills. These new markets further quenched consumers thirst for organic, locally made products and one-stop shopping.

    Hiller's reopens as Kroger to mixed reactions

    Detroit dining boom: The restaurant scene in the metro area continued to gain speed. In February, Detroit Free Press restaurant critic Sylvia Rector named Selden Standard in Midtown the Detroit Free Press 2015 Restaurant of the Year. And of the nine others that rounded out her best new restaurants list, half were in Detroit. These best new restaurants were the impetus for the Free Press Top 10 Takeover dining series that featured popular, and most often sold-out, events at all 10 restaurants. We’ve included Gold Cash Gold’s Farro Salad with Fermented Grapes in today’s recipe roundup.

    Freep's 2015 Restaurant of the Year is Selden Standard

    As we prepare to usher in 2016, we are sharing six of our favorite recipes from the past year. From our kitchen to yours: Have a happy — and healthy — new year.

    Lime Coconut Sour Cream Bundt Cake

    After zesting the limes in this recipe, squeeze the juice and reserve for another use. You can also add a bit of lime juice to the glaze.

    Add this beautiful Lime Coconut Sour Cream Bundt Cake to your brunch table. (Photo: Jessica J. Trevino Detroit Free Press)

    Blueberry Swirl Cheesecake

    Have yourself a healthier slice of cheesecake.

    Blueberry Swirl Cheesecake (Photo: Regina H. Boone Detroit Free Press.)

    Citrus Salmon with Basil Butter

    Give salmon a flavor boost with basil butter and citrus.

    Citrus Salmon with Basil Butter (Photo: Regina H. Boone Detroit Free Press)

    Farro Salad

    This recipe comes courtesy of Gold Cash Gold, one of metro Detroit’s best new restaurants.

    This Farro Salad recipe comes courtesy of Gold Cash Gold, one of metro Detroit’s best new restaurants. (Photo: Detroit Free Press)

    Honey Sriracha Chicken

    You can adjust the spiciness of this recipe to taste.

    Honey Sriracha Chicken with Soy and Cilantro can be adjusted to be more spicy or more sweet. (Photo: Mandi Wright Detroit Free Press)

    Spaghetti with Zucchini Pesto

    Put a twist on pesto by adding zucchini.

    Spaghetti with Zucchini Pesto. (Photo: Jessica J. Trevino Detroit Free Press)


    Red Alert

    For our Create Your Own Combination at Red Lobster (679 locations), we picked three shrimp dishes (Parrot Isle Jumbo Coconut, Walt’s Favorite, and Linguine Alfredo). With french fries as our side, Caesar as our salad, and just one Cheddar Bay Biscuit (such willpower!), our total came to 2,710 calories, 37 grams (two days’ worth) of sat fat, and 6,530 mg (a four-day supply) of sodium.

    It’s like eating an 8-piece bucket of KFC Original Recipe chicken with four sides of mashed potatoes with gravy, four pieces of corn on the cob, and eight packets of “buttery spread.”

    And since we were at Red Lobster, we had to order the chain’s namesake drink. So we added a 24 oz. Traditional Lobsterita (with its 890 calories and 860 mg of sodium). Ahoy, matey! Make room for 3,600 calories under that (newly expanded) belt.


    2015 Restaurant of the Year: Shaya - Recipes

    A decade ago in 2005, there were five StarChefs Rising Stars among the 65 James Beard Award finalists across all applicable categories, about eight percent of the finalists. This year there were 32 Rising Stars among the finalists accross 113 categories, that's more than 28 percent of all finalists. Seven of the 32 Rising Stars became James Beard Award winners on Monday May 3rd in Chicago. We're so proud to have been along for the ride of all these talented chefs who are now apart of an elite culinary group—may your successes continue and we hope to break bread with you again soon! Congratualtions to all the finalists and winners.

    The 2015 Restaurant and Chef Awards
    Best New Restaurant
    Bâtard, NYC

    Outstanding Baker
    Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery, NYC

    Outstanding Bar Program
    The Violet Hour, Chicago

    Outstanding Chef
    Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern, NYC

    Outstanding Pastry Chef
    Christina Tosi, Momofuku, NYC

    Outstanding Restaurant
    Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, NY

    Outstanding Restaurateur
    Donnie Madia, One Off Hospitality Group, Chicago (Blackbird, Avec, The Publican, and others)

    Outstanding Service
    The Barn at Blackberry Farm, Walland, TN

    Outstanding Wine Program
    A16, San Francisco

    Outstanding Wine, Beer, or Spirits Professional
    Rajat Parr, Mina Group, San Francisco

    Rising Star Chef of the Year
    Jessica Largey, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA

    Best Chef: Great Lakes
    Jonathon Sawyer, The Greenhouse Tavern, Cleveland

    Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic
    Spike Gjerde, Woodberry Kitchen, Baltimore

    Best Chef: Midwest
    Gerard Craft, Niche, Clayton, MO

    Best Chef: Northeast
    Barry Maiden, Hungry Mother, Cambridge, MA

    Best Chef: Northwest
    Blaine Wetzel, The Willows Inn on Lummi Island, Lummi Island, WA

    Best Chef: NYC
    Mark Ladner, Del Posto

    Best Chef: South
    Alon Shaya, Domenica, New Orleans

    Best Chef: Southeast
    Jason Stanhope, FIG, Charleston, SC

    Best Chef: Southwest
    Aaron Franklin, Franklin Barbecue, Austin

    Best Chef: West
    Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski, State Bird Provisions, San Francisco

    2015 James Beard Foundation Outstanding Restaurant Design Awards
    75 Seats and Under (For the best restaurant design or renovation in North America since January 1, 2012)
    Design Firm: Bureau of Architecture and Design
    Designers: James Gorski and Tom Nahabedian
    Project: Brindille, Chicago

    76 Seats and Over (For the best restaurant design or renovation in North America since January 1, 2012)
    Design Firm: SOMA
    Designers: Michel Abboud
    Project: Workshop Kitchen + Bar, Palm Springs, CA

    2015 James Beard Foundation America’s Classics
    Archie’s Waeside, Le Mars, IA
    Owner: Robert Rand

    Beaumont Inn, Harrodsburg, KY
    Owners: Elizabeth and Dixon Dedman, Helen and
    Chuck Dedman

    Guelaguetza, Los Angeles
    Owners: The Lopez Family

    Sally Bell’s Kitchen, Richmond, VA
    Owners: Martha Crowe Jones and Scott Jones

    Sevilla Restaurant, NYC
    Owners: Jose Lloves and Bienvenido Alvarez

    2015 James Beard Foundation Who’s Who of Food & Beverage in America
    Allan Benton
    Pork Producer and Purveyor
    Madisonville, TN

    Wylie Dufresne
    Chef and Restaurateur
    NYC

    Nathalie Dupree
    Cookbook Author and Television Personality
    Charleston, SC

    Maricel Presilla
    Chef, Restaurateur, and Cookbook Author
    Hoboken, NJ

    2015 James Beard Foundation Humanitarian of the Year
    Michel Nischan
    CEO, President and Co-Founder of Wholesome Wave
    Westport, CT

    2015 James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award
    Richard Melman
    Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises
    Chicago

    2015 James Beard Foundation Book Awards
    American Cooking
    Heritage
    Sean Brock
    (Artisan)

    Baking and Dessert
    Flavor Flours: A New Way to Bake with Teff, Buckwheat, Sorghum, Other Whole & Ancient Grains, Nuts & Non-Wheat Flours
    Alice Medrich
    (Artisan)

    Beverage
    Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail
    Dave Arnold
    (W. W. Norton & Company)

    Cooking from a Professional Point of View
    Bar Tartine: Techniques & Recipes
    Nicolaus Balla and Cortney Burns
    (Chronicle Books)

    Focus on Health
    Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing
    Keith Schroeder
    (Oxmoor House)

    General Cooking
    The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking
    Faith Durand and Sara Kate Gillingham
    (Clarkson Potter)

    International
    Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition
    David Sterling
    (University of Texas Press)

    Photography
    In Her Kitchen: Stories and Recipes from Grandmas Around the World
    Gabriele Galimberti
    (Clarkson Potter)

    Reference and Scholarship
    Butchering Poultry, Rabbit, Lamb, Goat, and Pork: The Comprehensive Photographic Guide to Humane Slaughtering and Butchering
    Adam Danforth
    (Storey Publishing)

    Single Subject
    Bitter: A Taste of the World's Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes
    Jennifer McLagan
    (Ten Speed Press)

    Vegetable Focused and Vegetarian
    At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well
    Amy Chaplin
    (Roost Books)

    Writing and Literature
    The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food
    Dan Barber
    (Penguin Press)

    Cookbook Hall of Fame
    Barbara Kafka

    Cookbook of the Year
    Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition
    David Sterling
    (University of Texas Press)

    2015 James Beard Foundation Broadcast Media Awards
    Podcast
    The Feed Podcast
    Hosts: Rick Bayless and Steve Dolinsky
    Producers: Matt Cunningham and Steve Dolinsky
    ​Airs on: soundcloud.com/thefeedpodcast

    Radio Show/Audio Webcast
    Hidden Kitchens World
    Producers: The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva)
    Airs on: NPR

    Special/Documentary
    Food Chains
    Host: Forest Whitaker
    Director: Sanjay Rawal
    Producers: Hamilton Fish, Smriti Keshari, Eva Longoria, Sanjay Rawal, and Eric Schlosser
    Airs: iTunes and Netflix

    Television Program, in Studio or Fixed Location
    Martha Stewart’s Cooking School
    Host: Martha Stewart
    Producers: Greta Anthony, Kimberly Miller Olko, Martha Stewart, Calia Brencsons-Van Dyk, and Lisa Wagner
    Airs On: PBS

    Television Program, on Location
    The Mind of a Chef
    Host: Anthony Bourdain
    Producers: Jared Andrukanis, Anthony Bourdain, Joe Caterini, Chris Collins, Michael Steed, and Lydia Tenaglia
    Airs on: PBS

    Television Segment
    CBS This Morning’s “The Dish”
    Host: Anthony Mason and Vinita Nair
    Producers: Brian Applegate, Greg Mirman, and Marci Waldman
    Airs on: CBS

    Video Webcast, Fixed Location and/or Instructional
    ChefSteps
    Host: Grant Lee Crilly and Chris Young
    Producer: Richard B. Wallace
    Airs on: chefsteps.com

    Video Webcast, on Location
    food.curated
    Host: Liza de Guia
    Producer: Liza de Guia
    Airs on: foodcurated.com

    Visual and Technical Excellence
    Wall of Fire: A ChefSteps Story
    Director: Sandy Smolan
    Photographer and Editor: Reva Keller
    Producers: Grant Crilly and Chris Young
    Airs on: chefsteps.com

    Outstanding Personality/Host
    Host: Ina Garten
    Barefoot Contessa: Back to Basics
    Airs on: Food Network

    2015 James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards
    Dining and Travel
    The India Issue
    The Editors of Saveur
    Saveur

    Food and Culture
    “The Toxic, Abusive, Addictive, Supportive, Codependent Relationship Between Chefs and Yelpers”
    Rebecca Flint Marx
    San Francisco Magazine

    Food and Health
    “Against the Grain”
    Michael Specter
    The New Yorker

    Food-Related Columns
    “Unearthed”
    Tamar Haspel
    The Washington Post

    Food Coverage in a General-Interest Publication
    GQ
    The Editors of GQ

    Food Politics, Policy, and the Environment
    “The Quinoa Quarrel: Who Owns the World’s Greatest Superfood?”
    Lisa M. Hamilton
    Harper’s with the Food & Environment Reporting Network

    Group Food Blog
    Grub Street

    Home Cooking
    “Cabbage Craft”
    Kathy Gunst
    EatingWell

    Humor
    “Giving & Thanking”
    Ben Schott with the Bon Appétit Editors
    Bon Appétit

    Individual Food Blog
    Orangette
    Molly Wizenberg

    Personal Essay
    “Life in Chains: Finding Home at Taco Bell”
    John DeVore
    Eater

    Profile
    “Élite Meat”
    Dana Goodyear
    The New Yorker

    Visual Storytelling
    “Make”
    Gillian Duffy
    New York

    Wine, Spirits, and Other Beverages
    “Into the Vines”
    Gabrielle Hamilton
    AFAR

    Craig Claiborne Distinguished Restaurant Review Award
    “Artisanal-Everything Roberta's Defies the Stereotypes,” “Once an Icon, Per Se is Showing its Age,” “Six Reasons Why Cosme is One of NYC's Most Relevant New Restaurants”
    Ryan Sutton
    Eater

    MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award
    “Life in Chains: Finding Home at Taco Bell”
    John DeVore
    Eater


    Restaurant of the Year: Table 128

    The grilled rack of lamb is presented with seasonal cauliflower and fava beans, a combination that scores with diners.

    Reviewed by Wini Moranville
    Photos by Duane Tinkey

    All mediocre restaurants are alike. Each great restaurant is great in its own way.

    This echo of Tolstoy’s famous quote (“All happy families are alike each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way”) came to me as I thought about Table 128, and why I’m naming it dsm magazine’s Restaurant of the Year. Indeed, the uniqueness of this venue—how it’s great in its own way—kept coming to mind.

    Mediocre restaurants have a certain turnkey feel: An ambitious chef starts with great concepts, ace mixologists design captivating drink recipes, front-of-the-house staffers get initial training to effect the restaurant’s vision.

    But too often, the day-to-day execution of the place gets left in the hands of those who can’t quite pull it off. The food falters because the top chef rarely cooks day to day. A bartender goes rogue, thinking he has a better way to make the drink than the precise instructions passed on by the pro in charge. (It generally doesn’t work out that way.)

    And often, the front of the house feels less like a team working together with the common goal of making each patron’s visit the best it can be and more like unsupervised self-contractors
    engaged to sell you food from the kitchen for the requisite 20 percent gratuity.

    And then there’s Table 128. Lynn and Sarah Pritchard’s Clive restaurant started off on a high note, earning praise from local restaurant reviewers (including me). Since then, they haven’t looked back.

    More recently, as this issue of dsm magazine was making its way through the production process, I was happy to learn that the Pritchards had been named the Iowa Restaurant Association’s “Restaurateurs of the Year” for 2015. The association praised Table 128 for exemplifying “everything an upscale casual independent restaurant should be.”

    That’s exactly what I had been thinking when I sat down to write this article.

    Let’s start, as we generally do, with the cocktails. There’s never a rogue moment here expert mixologist Blake Brown’s seductive, one-of-a-kind cocktails always deliver—because he’s nearly always behind the bar. It’s no surprise that he’s developed a loyal following.

    “We have a number of people who order the night’s feature cocktail without even knowing what it is, because they trust Blake,” Sarah Pritchard says.

    Alongside Brown is Amanda Schreiber, formerly the cocktail designer at Crème Cupcake, who came in second place in the 2014 Iowa’s Top Mixologist competition.

    I, too, trust the cocktail team without reservation, and I’m equally trusting of the kitchen. In fact, nearly every time I visit Table 128, I request the “chef’s choice,” letting chef Lynn Pritchard choose what he’s most passionate about at that particular moment.

    Sarah and Lynn Pritchard
    are dedicated to the evolution of their restaurant’s food, beverages and service, making every visit to
    Table 128 a fresh experience.

    Through this strategy, Pritchard turned me on to elk, a meat that in his hands brought all the tenderness of filet mignon, but with the bold richness of lamb or duck breast. Another night, he sent out guinea fowl, topped with a layer of byaldi (a ratatouille-like specialty from Spain) and wrapped in caul fat for added lusciousness. The result: a succulent bird with a subtly insistent wild flavor. Months later, I’m still dreaming about the accompanying potato purée, which had more in common with a silky sauce than a whipped starch, rimmed by a deeply flavored brown guinea fowl stock.

    To ensure that this venue was consistent enough to merit dsm’s Restaurant of the Year status, I made another visit just before writing this review. A burrata cheese and homegrown tomato toastie—complete with this amazing thing called tomato powder—delighted with a dashing late-summer appeal. A grilled rack of lamb with cauliflower and fava beans soared, and a pork feature, too, fired on all cylinders.

    I left thinking, this kitchen isn’t merely consistent—it gets better every time I visit.

    About the service, let me offer a little situational insight: Not long ago, I asked a prominent local restaurateur what he looked for when hiring a server.

    “Honestly,” he said, “I just want someone well groomed who will show up.”

    Clearly, Sarah Pritchard, who runs the front of the house, has higher standards.

    “While experience plays a part, I think Lynn and I would both say that we hire based on personality over any other quality,” she says.

    She adds that they conduct ongoing training on the menu, share articles and videos to keep employees engaged, and have paid to send staff members to New York and elsewhere for inspiration.

    The result is a certain style of server: They’re professional, poised and thoroughly knowledgeable, yet never uptight about it. Above all, they seem devoted to the overall vision of the Pritchards, and to their role in the crafting of a great dining experience.

    I also vote this staff least likely to say, “Are you still workin’ on that?” when they really mean, “Shall I clear your plates?”

    While some restaurants achieve greatness by hitting on a formula and pretty much sticking to it (801 Chophouse comes to mind), Table 128’s excellence derives from the Prichards’ desire to continually evolve.

    About her wine program, Sarah says, “I get bored drinking the same thing, so I’m constantly trying to find something I’ve never had before.” She also re-energized the restaurant’s decor less than two years after it opened.

    In the kitchen, Lynn Pritchard follows suit, never content to find a few greatest hits and keep playing them night after night. “We’re not satisfied with what we did yesterday,” he says. “We want today to be better.”


    Watch the video: 2015-1-2 Λευκες Εστιατοριο-Γαλατσι Αθηνα-Greece No2 (July 2022).


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