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What You Can Do to Aid Typhoon Victims in the Philippines

What You Can Do to Aid Typhoon Victims in the Philippines



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With the Philippines utterly devastated by the destructive typhoon, many sources are reporting the survivors' pleas for food and water. About half of the Philippines' population lives in rural areas, many of which were destroyed by the storm. The Daily Mail reported that "survivors walked the streets 'like zombies looking for food' while looters ransacked shops and mobs attacked aid trucks loaded with food, tents, and water." They further reported that more than 600,000 people were displaced by the storm across the country and some have no access to food, water, or medicine, according to the UN. Multiple sources estimate that the death toll will exceed 10,000 victims.

While there are many ways to contribute to recovery efforts, aid organizations say that clean water and food are desperately needed to revitalize the people. To be a part of the solution, we compiled a list of relief efforts that you can securely contribute to in an effort to support the Filipino people in their darkest hours:

United Nations World Food Programme

So far, the program has given $2 million in support and will send more than 40 tons of high-energy biscuits. They are also closely working with the Filipino government to improve logistics and emergency communication systems so the donations they collect can effectively arrive.
Click here to make a donation!

Red Cross

The Red Cross is working on the ground to help connect families, mobilize communication lines, and offer support for those desperately in need. They're accepting donation/support checks mailed to local Red Cross chapters with "Philippines Typhoons and Flood" in the memo line.
Click here to make a donation!

World Vision

The organization is seeking to raise $20 million to help the families affected by this tragedy. They are also trying to provide everything from food and blankets to hygiene kits, emergency shelter, and protection for children to help them cope.

Mercy Corps

This organization already sent emergency response teams to bring food, water, shelter, and other necessary supplies to survivors and is looking for any donations to further their efforts.
Click here to make a donation!

AmeriCares

The organization has sent shipments containing enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies, and pain relievers. In addition, they are providing $10,000 in funding that will allow partners to purchase and distribute relief supplies in the hardest-hit areas.
Click here to make a donation!

Care

The immediate focus for this organization is the essentials. They are looking for ways to provide ground support to survivors who are seeking food, water, and shelter.
Click here to donate!


6 Ways You Can Help Victims of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines

Image via International Medical Corps Facebook

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL CORPS

The International Medical Corps focuses on infection control and deployed a team of medical personnel and sanitation experts to respond immediately to the disaster. The organization also ships clean water, food and medicine. Donate here or text MED to 80888 to make a donation.

Image via MercyCorps Facebook

MERCYCORPS

MercyCorps’ teams of emergency responders deliver food, water, basic supplies and temporary shelter to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. Support their efforts by donating here or by calling 1.888.747.7440.

Image via Red Cross Philippines Facebook

PHILIPPINE RED CROSS

The Philippine Red Cross has set up a website for donations as well as a tracking service to help restore families affected by the typhoon. Visitors to the site can search through the list of missing persons, register people that they have lost contact with or report that they themselves are alive. Donate here.

Image via Shelter Box Facebook

SHELTER BOX

ShelterBox provides emergency shelter kits and lifesaving supplies for families affected by disasters. To date, they have distributed 1,500 standard kits, 16 midi tents and 202 boxes of supplies to families in the Philippines and will continue to send aid every two weeks over the next few months. Donate here.


Filipino bayanihan spirit brings relief, attention to Typhoon Ulysses victims

After Typhoon Ulysses flooded communities and damaged property in Luzon, Filipinos were quick to act even in the face of limited mobility and slow disaster response due to the unexpected deluge of rescue reports.

With the need for efficient and rapid assistance, several concerned citizens banded together and took it upon themselves to make use of what they have to help their countrymen in their time of need.

Flooded with calls for help

At the height of Typhoon Ulysses’ fury, calls for help flooded social media as affected families pleaded for rescue and relief. In parts of Marikina and Rizal, flood waters had risen to as high as the second floor of houses, leaving families stranded on rooftops.

Targetting to organize these calls for help for quicker response, Rappler’s civic engagement arm MovePH issued a call for volunteers to help track and verify pleas for rescue and relief as early as Thursday, November 12. With at least 1,000 volunteers responding to the call, MovePH amplified verified rescue reports and brought them to the attention of the Office of Civil Defense, and Red Cross Philippines, among others.

By Saturday, November 14, MovePH had monitored with the help of volunteers more than 1,600 reports for rescue and relief from Marikina, Rizal, Bulacan, Cagayan, and other parts of Luzon.

Coming together and consolidating efforts

Even with the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic, many maximized the use of social media to promote donation drives as Filipinos responded to the needs of affected communities devastated by Typhoon Ulysses.

Typhoon Ulysses struck the Philippines while the country was still reeling from Super Typhoon Rolly. Several groups leading donation drives for victims of Super Typhoon Rolly also extended their help to those affected by Typhoon Ulysses.

This outpouring of initiatives in light of the successive disasters pushed various youth organizations in the country to band together and help consolidate rescue efforts, load requests, and relief drives for those heavily hit.

Formed on November 12, YouthRisePH started with 5 youth groups determined to work together to provide relief to victims. Among those who pioneered the effort were Online Sustainable Development Goals Youth Action Forum, Kids for Kids, Makesense Philippines, Black Fawn Events, and AIESEC in the Philippines. The initiative later pulled in more than 1,000 volunteers and 250 partner organizations that allowed it to organize relief efforts, connect with corporations for aid, consolidate rescue requests, and provide load to victims of recent disasters.

“Social media is a powerful tool to collate and collaborate…. I think a lot of people want to volunteer, but [are] limited right now due to the typhoon and the COVID-19 pandemic,” Mark Jacinto, one of the leads of YouthRisePH, explained.


How You Can Help the Relief Efforts

Samaritan’s Purse

With a response team on the ground in the Philippines, Samaritan’s Purse has sent water and nutrition experts to the affected islands. The organization is also providing community water filters, protective tarps, blankets, hygiene kits, and emergency family food packets, and has a team ready to help in Vietnam, which has since been hit as well.

Feed the Hungry

With the goal of providing 1 million meal rations to the hardest-hit city of Tacloban, Feed the Hungry is asking for donations to help those affected by the typhoon.

Donate to Feed the Hungry | Follow the organization: Twitter | Facebook

Save the Children

With disaster relief efforts in the Philippines, Laos, and Vietnam, Save the Children is asking for donations to provide emergency assistance to both children and families in all of the affected countries.

Oxfam

With people on the ground in the Philippines, Oxfam is looking for donations to provide for supplies including food, water, medicine, and shelter.

Donate to Oxfam | Follow the organization: Twitter | Facebook

World Vision

For as little as $24, you can donate to World Vision to provide a blanket and mosquito net. A donation of $33 can supply clean water and a hygiene kit for a family, while $184 can give a family emergency shelter.

Donate to World Vision | Follow the organization: Twitter | Facebook

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat is trying to raise $10.3 million (or 450 million Philippine Pesos) to provide affected families with shelter.

Google's People Finder

Google has launched a tool that helps individuals who are searching for the status of people affected by the storm. Individuals can either search for someone or provide information about someone they know. This is a very helpful resource for those who have relatives in the Philippines and are unable to contact them.

If you know of any other helpful resources, please share them in the comments.


Aid workers struggle to reach victims of Philippines typhoon

MANILA -- Four days after Typhoon Haiyan blew away their homes and livelihoods, most Philippine victims remain in far-flung flooded coastal communities where they so far have been unable to obtain assistance, aid workers say.

The United Nations on Tuesday launched an appeal for $301 million to help victims, while U.S. and British warships headed toward the region.

In its appeal for funds, the U.N. estimated that more than 11 million people have been affected by the typhoon, one of the strongest storms ever to hit land, with 660,000 left homeless. The official death toll passed 1,700 on Tuesday and is expected to rise substantially.

However, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III downplayed estimates that 10,000 or more people may have died, telling CNN that the death toll would more likely be about 2,000 to 2,500 people.

Arriving Tuesday in Manila to coordinate the efforts, U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos said that money was needed for “food, health, sanitation, shelter, debris removal and also protection of the most vulnerable.’’

Before her arrival, the U.N. released $25 million in emergency funds. Other governments have pledged more than $35 million.

On the hard-hit island of Leyte, there is only one major airport it’s in the devastated city of Tacloban. Aid workers say that the road from the airport into the city is so clogged with debris, interspersed with the now-putrefying remains of the dead, that it takes three hours to get from the airport into the city center. Roads leading inland are entirely impassable.

“We have not been able to get into the remote communities,” Amos told reporters. “Even in Tacloban, because of the debris and the difficulties with logistics and so on, we have not been able to get in the level of supply that we would want to. We are going to do as much as we can to bring in more.”

Katherine Manik, country director for ChildFund International, said that an aid crew was able to reach the city of Ormoc on the other side of Leyte by boat but couldn’t move far from the dock.

“There is a critical need for fresh drinking water and food, but it is very difficult to get anything in. There aren’t enough boats. There is no electricity. Nobody can even recharge their cellphones,’’ said Manik.

Even in at the makeshift clinic next to the Tacloban Airport, where the Philippine Air Force’s C-130 cargo planes have been making regular runs from Manila, aid workers complained that they have no medicine to treat emergency cases.

“It’s overwhelming,” air force Capt. Antonio Tamayo told the Inquirer Daily News. “We need more medicine. We cannot give anti-tetanus vaccine shots because we have none.”

One difficulty is that the infrastructure of local government has disappeared. Tacloban Mayor Alfred Romualdez told reporters that of 1,300 police, only 100 were coming to work.

Telephones are not working and local radio is out.

One radio anchorman in Tacloban City was drowned as he gave updates on the typhoon from a two-story office building downtown, using generators to make up for the lack of electrical power.

The last anybody heard from him was when the program abruptly went off the air.

The coastal topography of the Philippines might have contributed to the unexpectedly high storm surges, which many witnesses compared to a tsunami.

“The entire country is coastal areas. It isn’t like India. There isn’t much inland. This typhoon made landfall in the Philippines nine times at different locations. You had not just the wind, but the tidal surges and the swelling of water,’’ said Warner Passanisi, the global emergency response coordinator at ChildFund International.

Although there were warnings for days about the typhoon, many people did not evacuate, confident because they had weathered previous storms.

Narcissa Abordo, a 65-year-old grandmother from Tacloban who runs a boarding house, was taking care of her two young grandchildren to help out her daughter, who lives in Manila. She was awakened Friday at 3 a.m. by powerful winds and started to prepare breakfast for her grandchildren.

Suddenly, there was a rushing sound and a “black whirlpool of water,” she said. Abordo passed the children one by one to her boarders, who took them to high ground in the second floor of a neighbor’s house. The water, she said, rose to 13 feet in 10 seconds.

Abordo and her son were swept away by the rushing water. As the the water rose, it slid them past houses -- from one tin roof to another, and they tried to grab onto whatever electric wires they passed. Abordo could not swim. She survived only because her son carried her on his shoulders.

She said she pleaded with her son: “Please save yourself -- I am already old. You can leave me. You are young.” He refused. “I will never leave you,” she recalled him saying.

Mother and son survived the storm, but her grandchildren were not so lucky.

Abordo said she will never understand what happened. She was told that one child got nervous because the water was rising and jumped in. Shortly after, the other child jumped in. The children, she was told, were crying and yelling, “Mama, Mama, Papa . .”

Her grandson’s body has been found the granddaughter is still missing.

“But,” said Abordo, “I think she is nearby because I saw her skirt when I walked down a street.”

Special correspondent DeLeon reported from Manila and staff writer Demick from Beijing. Special correspondent Daryl Dano in Tacloban contributed to this report.


Aid workers struggle to reach victims of Philippines typhoon

MANILA -- Four days after Typhoon Haiyan blew away their homes and livelihoods, most Philippine victims remain in far-flung flooded coastal communities where they so far have been unable to obtain assistance, aid workers say.

The United Nations on Tuesday launched an appeal for $301 million to help victims, while U.S. and British warships headed toward the region.

In its appeal for funds, the U.N. estimated that more than 11 million people have been affected by the typhoon, one of the strongest storms ever to hit land, with 660,000 left homeless. The official death toll passed 1,700 on Tuesday and is expected to rise substantially.

However, Philippine President Benigno Aquino III downplayed estimates that 10,000 or more people may have died, telling CNN that the death toll would more likely be about 2,000 to 2,500 people.

Arriving Tuesday in Manila to coordinate the efforts, U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos said that money was needed for “food, health, sanitation, shelter, debris removal and also protection of the most vulnerable.’’

Before her arrival, the U.N. released $25 million in emergency funds. Other governments have pledged more than $35 million.

On the hard-hit island of Leyte, there is only one major airport it’s in the devastated city of Tacloban. Aid workers say that the road from the airport into the city is so clogged with debris, interspersed with the now-putrefying remains of the dead, that it takes three hours to get from the airport into the city center. Roads leading inland are entirely impassable.

“We have not been able to get into the remote communities,” Amos told reporters. “Even in Tacloban, because of the debris and the difficulties with logistics and so on, we have not been able to get in the level of supply that we would want to. We are going to do as much as we can to bring in more.”

Katherine Manik, country director for ChildFund International, said that an aid crew was able to reach the city of Ormoc on the other side of Leyte by boat but couldn’t move far from the dock.

“There is a critical need for fresh drinking water and food, but it is very difficult to get anything in. There aren’t enough boats. There is no electricity. Nobody can even recharge their cellphones,’’ said Manik.

Even in at the makeshift clinic next to the Tacloban Airport, where the Philippine Air Force’s C-130 cargo planes have been making regular runs from Manila, aid workers complained that they have no medicine to treat emergency cases.

“It’s overwhelming,” air force Capt. Antonio Tamayo told the Inquirer Daily News. “We need more medicine. We cannot give anti-tetanus vaccine shots because we have none.”

One difficulty is that the infrastructure of local government has disappeared. Tacloban Mayor Alfred Romualdez told reporters that of 1,300 police, only 100 were coming to work.

Telephones are not working and local radio is out.

One radio anchorman in Tacloban City was drowned as he gave updates on the typhoon from a two-story office building downtown, using generators to make up for the lack of electrical power.

The last anybody heard from him was when the program abruptly went off the air.

The coastal topography of the Philippines might have contributed to the unexpectedly high storm surges, which many witnesses compared to a tsunami.

“The entire country is coastal areas. It isn’t like India. There isn’t much inland. This typhoon made landfall in the Philippines nine times at different locations. You had not just the wind, but the tidal surges and the swelling of water,’’ said Warner Passanisi, the global emergency response coordinator at ChildFund International.

Although there were warnings for days about the typhoon, many people did not evacuate, confident because they had weathered previous storms.

Narcissa Abordo, a 65-year-old grandmother from Tacloban who runs a boarding house, was taking care of her two young grandchildren to help out her daughter, who lives in Manila. She was awakened Friday at 3 a.m. by powerful winds and started to prepare breakfast for her grandchildren.

Suddenly, there was a rushing sound and a “black whirlpool of water,” she said. Abordo passed the children one by one to her boarders, who took them to high ground in the second floor of a neighbor’s house. The water, she said, rose to 13 feet in 10 seconds.

Abordo and her son were swept away by the rushing water. As the the water rose, it slid them past houses -- from one tin roof to another, and they tried to grab onto whatever electric wires they passed. Abordo could not swim. She survived only because her son carried her on his shoulders.

She said she pleaded with her son: “Please save yourself -- I am already old. You can leave me. You are young.” He refused. “I will never leave you,” she recalled him saying.

Mother and son survived the storm, but her grandchildren were not so lucky.

Abordo said she will never understand what happened. She was told that one child got nervous because the water was rising and jumped in. Shortly after, the other child jumped in. The children, she was told, were crying and yelling, “Mama, Mama, Papa . .”

Her grandson’s body has been found the granddaughter is still missing.

“But,” said Abordo, “I think she is nearby because I saw her skirt when I walked down a street.”

Special correspondent DeLeon reported from Manila and staff writer Demick from Beijing. Special correspondent Daryl Dano in Tacloban contributed to this report.

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Barbara Demick is a former foreign correspondent for the Los Angeles Times who previously headed bureaus in Beijing and Seoul, as well as New York. She is the author of “Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea” and “Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo Neighborhood.” Demick has won Britain’s Samuel Johnson Award for best nonfiction the George Polk Award the Robert F. Kennedy Award the Osborn Elliott Prize for Journalism from the Asia Society the Overseas Press Club’s Joe and Laurie Dine Award for human rights reporting the American Academy of Diplomacy’s Arthur Ross Award and Stanford University’s Shorenstein Award for best Asia reporting. She has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. She was a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.


Aftermath of Typhoon Rolly: Here is how you can help

THE STRONGEST typhoon to hit land this year, typhoon Rolly (international name: Goni) swept through the Philippines on Nov. 1, leaving Catanduanes and Bicol devastated. As more news from these and other affected areas start to come out as communication lines are restored, many people are asking how they can help. Here is a list of organizations and individuals — from media giants to party list groups to NGOs to a K-pop fans club to an artist best known for his cheerful work — that are raising donations to help the victims of Typhoon Rolly. The list will be updated as more information arrives.

KAPUSO FOUNDATION
THE GMA Kapuso Foundation calls for donations to give aid to people who may be affected by Typhoon Rolly. To donate online to GMA Kapuso Foundation, visit www.gmanetwork.com/kapusofoundation/donate.

ABS-CBN Foundation
The ABS-CBN Foundation is accepting cash donations as part of its Sagip Kapamilya program to reach out to Filipinos affected by Typhoon Rolly. Those interested may donate through the following accounts: BDO (Peso Account) 0039301-14199 Swift Code: BNORPHMM BDO (Dollar Account) 1039300-81622 Swift Code: BNORPHMM BPI 3051-1155-88 Swift Code: BOPIPHMM Metrobank 636-3-636-08808-1 Swift Code: MBTCPHMM PNB 1263-7000-4128 Swift Code: PNBMPHMM Security Bank 000003312430-0 Swift Code: SETCPHMM.

ROBERT ALEJANDRO DONATION DRIVE
ARTIST and TV host Robert Alejandro is offering to create caricatures of your children in exchange for a donation to help victims of the typhoon. Those interested can send Mr. Alejandro a personal message with the photo of the child and their e-mail address via his personal Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/kuya.robert) and upon donation, he will be sending the high-resolution photo to the e-mail address.

BRIGHTS PHILIPPINES FC DONATION DRIVE
A RELIEF and rehabilitation network of various youth organizations, Tulong Kabataan, in partnership with BunnyWolf PH, Brightwin Nation, and Brights Philippines FC, is calling for donations for those affected by Typhoon Rolly. Donations can be sent via PayPal: [email protected] or [email protected] or via GCash: 0917-1557-610 (Sherlan S.) or 0936-911-8083 (Aiza Castillo).

TEAM #ROCKEDRELIEF
TEAM #RockEdRelief is collecting non-perishables to send to Bicol, and two barangays in Batangas. They are looking for: blankets, laundered clothes, towels, socks, pillows, sleeping mats, mosquito nets, canned food (for now), used tarpaulins (for floor coverings). Commune, Polaris St., Makati (Bgy Poblaciòn) is receiving donations in kind starting Nov. 4 from noon to 4 p.m. Labeled boxes or transparent bags are appreciated in order to avoid opening packages. For purchasing assistance (meant for brand new underwear, sanitary napkins, diapers, and hygiene kits), send donations to BPI 3080-0073-44 Rock Ed Philippines and send the amount and name for donor’s receipt recording.

TULONG KABATAAN
THE SAME Tulong Kabataan is also holding a separate donation drive for those affected by the typhoon in the Bicol Region and the National Capital Region (NCR). Donations can be made in cash and in kind. For cash donations, donate via the BPI Savings Account number 008339 4735 53 or BDO Savings Account number 012220 0134 36. Both are under the name of Thalia R. Villela. Those who want to donate in kind or via GCash can do so by contacting Joshua Marcial via 0195-268-3515. Paypal donations are also accepted via paypal.me/trvillela.

ANAKBAYAN PUP
AN ORGANIZATION from the Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP) is also holding a donation drive for those affected by the typhoon in Bicol and NCR. Donations can be made via GCash through Christine Franes (0918-348-3943) or via PayMaya through Jersey Mari Arante (0917-885-1280). Donations can also be made through the BPI Savings Account number 4869 1284 95 under the name Maria Czarina Mapili and via Paypal: [email protected]

MYDAYS BICOL
THE BICOL fan group of K-Pop boy group Day6 is calling for donations to provide assistance to help Bicolanos affected by the super typhoon. The group is asking for cash and in kind donations and noted that they are prioritizing rice, non-perishable goods, clothes, and potable water. Those who want to donate in cash can do so via GCash (0905-4626-654), via PayMaya (0905-4626-654), via BPI Savings Account number 0669120168, and via PayPal at paypal.me/mydaysbicol. A copy of the deposit slip should be e-mailed to [email protected]. Those who want to donate in kind can drop off their donations at Sta. Rafaela Maria Students Home, Sagpon, Daraga, Albay, 4501. For more information, call 0999-4820-934 and 0951-5091-524.

KAYA NATIN
NON-PARTISAN, non-governmental organization based in Quezon City, Kaya Natin, is also holding a donation drive for typhoon victims and is asking for cash donations. Those who want to donate can do so via BPI Account number 3081-1173-72 under the name KN Movement for Good Governance and Ethical Leadership Inc., or via Paypal at kayanatin.ph/donate. Send your deposit slips to [email protected] For inquiries contact Kaya Natin at 0917-822-6628 or e-mail [email protected]

TABANGAN TA ANG CATANDUANES
SEVERAL medical groups including the Association of Medical Doctors of Asia Philippines are asking for donations specifically for those in Catanduanes affected by the typhoon. Deposits can be made through GCash via Karen Martinez (0956-4211-832) or via the BDO Savings Account number 002650493646 under the name Marian Faye H. de Claro.

BANGON ORAGON
THE 6 TH MEDICINE Student Council of the College of Medicine, Bicol University is doing a donation drive for Bicolanos affected by the typhoon. The donations can be made through BPI (1639-0764-89) and GCash (0965-4811-357) under the name Christian F. Picones. Donations are also accepted via Land Bank of the Philippines (1496-249-530), PayMaya (0919-95403519), and Metrobank (677-3-677-07866-0) all under the name Irene C. Velasco. To confirm your donation, send a message to 0965-481-1357 via SMS Viber or Telegram.

UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES LOS BANOS
THE STUDENT union of the University of the Philippines Los Baños is holding a donation drive to benefit the victims of the typhoon from the CALABARZON and Bicol Region. Those who want to donate can do so via Landbank (1896-3525-73) and GCash (0953-3081-839) both under the name Maria Joy D. Dela Providencia. Donations can also be made through Paypal at paypal.me/stpbuplb. For in kind donations contact 0953-3081-839. Those who want to volunteer their time can sign up via https://bit.ly/3fWlitu.

SINING BANWA
SINING Banwa, a community-based multi-arts organization based in Albay is calling for donations to help those affected in Barangay Busay in Daraga, Albay and other communities. Donations can be made in cash and in kind. Those who want to donate in kind can drop off their donations at Sining Banwa Harong Door 4, ALA Compound, Orange St., Sunrise Subdivision, Cruzada, Legazpi City. In cash donations can be made through BPI (0859-2548-45) under Jobert Landeza, Chinabank (108002036024 Swift code: CHBKPHMM) under Sining Banwa Albay Performance Collective Inc, GCash (0935-465-9359) under the name Jobert Landeza. For more information, contact 0975-981-4207.

TANGING YAMAN FOUNDATION
TANGING Yaman Foundation is asking for donations for those affected by the typhoon. In kind donations are requested to be in the form of canned goods, instant noodles, bottled water, rice, hygiene kits, diapers, sanitary napkins, and powdered milk. In kind donations can be dropped off at the ADMU (Ateneo de Manila University) LS Covered courts. Monetary donations can be made through the Metrobank account of the Tanging Yaman Foundation Inc., at 448-7-44800988-9 or via GCash at 0947-565-9544. Checks should be made payable to Tanging Yaman Foundation Inc. For more information contact the foundation via 0947-565-95244.

AKOBAKWIT
AKOBAKWIT, a non-governmental organization promoting and protecting the rights and welfare of the internally displaced, is also calling for donations for typhoon victims. Donations can be made through Ako Bakwit BPI Savings Account at 0293-0053-79, Paymaya at 0917-607-7718, PayPal at [email protected], and GCash 0917-607-7718. In kind donations can be dropped off at Ziya Boutique, ground floor, Glorietta 3, Makati City.

ATENEO DE MANILA UNIVERSITY
THE OFFICIAL disaster response and management team of the Ateneo de Manila University is collecting donations for typhoon victims via the Ateneo de Manila University BPI Savings Account (Peso) at 3083-7210-56. More donation options are available at giving.ateneo.edu.

GABRIELA PHILIPPINES
GABRIELA Philippines, a non-governmental organization advocating for women’s rights, is also calling for donations for families affected by the typhoon. For cash donations, donate via the Lingap Gabriela, Inc. Chinabank Account (105002008935) with Swift Code: CHBKPHMM. For donations in kind, drop offs are at Lingap Gabriela Office at SATU Bldg., Blk 73, Lot 11, Don Mariano Marcos Ave., North Fairview, Quezon City, or at the Gabriela Women’s Party Office, #25 K-10 St., West Kamias, Quezon City, or at the Gabriela National Office at #35 Scout Delgado, Brgy. Laging Handa, Quezon City. For more information, contact 8464-2652 or 0977-6344808.

BAYAN MUNA PARTYLIST BAYANG MATULUNGIN RELIEF OPERATIONS
THE BAYAN Muna Partylist is asking for in kind donations — in the form of canned goods, bottled water, clothes, hygiene kits, and medicine — and cash donations for those affected by the typhoon. Those who want to donate in kind can drop off their donations at Block 31 Lot 13 A. Bonifacio St., New Capitol Estate 1, Brgy. Batasan Hills, District 2, Quezon City. Cash donations can be made through GCash (0917-168-6352), PayMaya (0917-168-6352), or PayPal paypal.me/leafullon. Contact Sarah Velasco at 0923-535-419 for inquiries.

JCI PHILIPPINES-OPLAN KAAGAPAY SUPER TYPHOON ROLLY
THE JUNIOR Chamber International (JCI) is asking for donations both in kind (canned goods, towels, hygiene kits, relief packages, cash donations) and in cash. Donation drop-off point is located at the JCI Philippines Headquarters, 14 Don A. Roces Ave., Quezon City, Metro Manila. Contact NED Constantine Ignacio (0917-533-7474) for inquiries and for donations in-kind. Cash donations can be made through BDO, Quezon Avenue-Heroes Hills Branch (Junior Chamber International Phils., Inc. / Smart Checking Account No. 002018025076 / Swift Code BNORPHMM). To coordinate cash donations, contact NC John Joshua Cudia (0935-426-8718).

JUANSPARK YOUTH LEADERS
JUANSPARK Youth Leaders are asking for donations of at least P20 for the benefit of the typhoon victims. Donations can be made through BDO (Nanette Tagudar / 007960016388), BPI (Marielle Alemania / 0129399139) or GCash (Charmaine Gilo / 0977-455-3757). Contact Marielle Alemania at 0949-167-1154 for inquiries.

CAMPUS ALLIANCE FOR DEDICATED AND UNIFIED ACTION-UP BAGUIO
THE CAMPUS Alliance for Dedicated and Unified Action at University of the Philippines-Baguio is asking for monetary donations for typhoon victims. Those who want to donate can do so via BPI (1249249609), GCash (Cielo Madarang / 0915-884-8927), BDO (Laika Jezrel G. Mendoza / 005050274444), Land Bank (Airah Carhize Ami / 0226473556), PayMaya (Luianna Isabel Santos / 0927-256-9460), PayPal paypal.me/venicenieva.

UP CATANDUNGAN TABANG CATANDUANES
A UNIVERSITY of the Philippines Los Baños group is asking for donations in cash and in kind for those affected by the typhoon in Catanduanes. Cash donations can be made through Metrobank (Romeo Russel Ham Somido / 1813 1813 62996) BDO (Shilley Babe P. Sta. Rosa / 0060 3023 3660), GCash (Carla Angelica Tulipat / 0917-780-5158), PayMaya (Carla Angelica Tulipat / 0920-911-2805). For in-kind donations, coordinate with Ma. Arlene S. Borja (0917-307-9148) or Meyrick U. Tablizo (0947-614-3724).

KALINGA SA PANAHON NG PANDEMYA
THE DONATION drive focused on helping people through the pandemic is now also asking for donations for those affected by the typhoon. Donations can be in cash or in kind. In kind donations can be dropped off at SM Fairview, contact Maverick or Jemimah at 0977-219-0229. Cash donations can be made via PNB (Jemimah Keren R. Ladeza at 107910038784), GCash (Maverick Segismundo at 0977-219-0229) or PayPal paypal.me/MiguelAntonioLegaspi.

TAGANI PH
A COMMUNITY of advocates for Philippine Farmers, Tagani PH, is asking for cash donations to benefit their partner-farmers who have been affected by the typhoon. Donations can be made through PayPal paypal.me/TaganiPH and through GCash, UnionBank, and BPI. Details on those bank accounts can be accessed via https://twitter.com/TaganiPH/status/1323227774811693058/photo/1.

SAGIP KANAYUNAN-OPLAN RESCUE COUNTRYSIDE
SAGIP Kanayunan, a relief and rehabilitation effort of the Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas to benefit peasant communities affected by typhoons and other calamities, is now accepting donations for typhoon ravaged farmers and fisherfolks. The successive typhoons since Nika, Ofel, Pepito, and Quinta resulted in severe losses for palay farmers. The effort is asking for in kind donations such as common medicines, seeds, farm tools, and supplies. For cash donations, BPI (Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas/Peso Account 445-1001-286/Dollar Account 445-4002-488). To drop off in kind donations, contact the organization through its Twitter account https://twitter.com/kmp_phl.

IUPLIFT
IPLIFT, a student-led initiative providing students with distance learning tools, is asking for donations for its partner communities in Labo and Basud, Camarines Norte. One may donate through BPI (Zion Enrico Licup, 006216674918) or through GCash (Megumi Hosena, 0999-397-5745). They will also provide relief packs and hot meals to selected evacuation centers.


2. Save The Children

Who they are: Save the Children works to give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. In times of natural disaster they put children's needs first.

What they're doing: Save the Children is sending household kits, education kits and hygiene kits for children in the Philippines. They estimate that up to 7,000 schools could have been damaged by the storm.

How you can help: Donate on their website here.


#ReliefPH: Help communities affected by Super Typhoon Rolly

Many Filipinos are in need of help after 2020's most powerful tropical cyclone yet hit the Philippines.

In Albay, at least 10 people died on Sunday, November 1, due to Super Typhoon Rolly. It triggered mass evacuations, with nearly 3,000 families displaced in all 5 provinces in Calabarzon.

The super typhoon had come on the heels of Typhoon Quinta, which already destroyed houses and flooded parts of Bicol and Mindoro less than a week after Rolly made landfall.

Seeing the impact of Rolly, several groups have spearheaded relief efforts to help affected communities.

Here is a running list of relief efforts seeking to help survivors of Super Typhoon Rolly:

Bicol Region

Albay Leaders for the Marginalized Sectors

Albay Leaders for the Marginalized Sectors is calling for donations to help those affected by Super Typhoon Rolly in Albay.

Those interested may donate through the following accounts:

BDO
Aiella Antonia Recto
0042 5019 3090

BPI
John Immanuel D Estevez
0069 0932 41

For questions or concerns, you may contact John Estevez at 0917 626 3671 or Miguel Mendoza at 0905 229 0097.

Ateneo de Naga University

Atene de Naga University is organizing relief efforts to help affected communities.

Those who would like to help may make monetary donations to Ateneo de Naga University's bank accounts:

  • BPI, Naga Caceres Branch
    Peso Savings: 8863-0478-04 Dollar Savings: 8864-0093-02
    Swift Code: BOPIPHMM
  • BDO, Elias Angeles Branch
    Peso Savings: 5970-114724 Dollar Savings: 5970-110745
    Swift Code: BNORPHMM

Overseas donors may send here. Check “Ateneo de Naga University” as the donee institution and state “for Typhoon Rolly (Goni) efforts” in the comments section.

Send an email to [email protected] with a scan or photo of the deposit slip/transaction for proper acknowledgment.

Barkada Kontra Droga-Naga

Barkada Kontra Droga-Naga, a joint project of the Naga City Dangerous Drugs Board and Naga students, is accepting donations to help households heavily hit by Super Typhoon Rolly.

They are accepting monetary donations through GCash:
Berlineth Nymia Montes
0909-226-7611

They are also in need of the following in-kind donations:

  • Food
  • Water
  • Toiletries
  • Galvanized roof
  • Lumber
  • Plywood

You may drop off in-kind donations at the NCDDB Office at the 2nd Floor of the Jesse M. Robredo Coliseum.

BUCS College Student Council

The Bicol University College of Science Student Council, in partnership with the Bicol University College of Medicine Student Council and Unnie CEF KShop, is accepting donations to help Bicolanos affected by Super Typhoon Rolly.

The funds collected will be used to purchase goods for affected families.

Monetary donations may be sent to any of the following accounts:

For an acknowledgement receipt, email [email protected] with the following information:

For in-kind donations within Sorsogon Province and further inquiries, contact the following numbers: 0946-011-6015, 0961-596-6709, and 0919-955-1445.

Global Institute for Youth Development

The Global Institute for Youth Development is accepting donations through its relief drive AlBayanihan to help residents of Albay who were affected by Super Typhoon Rolly.

Monetary donations can be sent through the following accounts:

All monetary proceeds will be used to purchase goods for typhoon survivors in Albay.

They are also accepting these in-kind donations:

  • Food items
  • Clothes
  • Blankets and pillows
  • PPE (alcohol, masks, face shields, etc.)
  • Hygiene materials

In-kind donations can be dropped off at Philippine Red Cross Building, Gov. Locsin Cor. Fr. JL Bates St., 4500 Legazpi, Albay (beside Macao Imperial Tea Albay and before Albay Central School).

People who want to drop off in-kind donations may coordinate with Red Cross Albay Focal Person Stephanie Ranoco at 09154282227.

For more inquiries, contact any of the following:

  • Jodel M. Lotivio
    0956 310 8126
  • Jave Andrae M. Lotivio
    0977 393 5312
  • Maria Virginia Navarra
    0951 211 8618
Kilusang Magbubukid ng Bicol

Kilusang Magbubukid ng Bicol is a democratic and militant movement of landless peasants, small farmers, farm workers, rural youth, and peasant women. They are now seeking donations to help farmers in need after Super Typhoon Rolly through their Oplan Sagip Kanayunan.

They aim to give immediate relief such as rice, food, hygiene kits, drinking water, clothes, sleeping kits, and medicine. They also hope to provide seed, seedlings, farm tools, and farm animals among others in the long-term.

For donations, you may contact them through their Facebook page.

Cash donations may be sent through the following accounts:

BPI
0853-0845-49
Farmers Assistance for Resource Mgt. Education & Rehabilitation Inc.
Legazpi, Albay Branch

In-kind donations may also be dropped off in the following areas:

  • 56 K-9th St, Brgy. West Kamias, Quezon City, Philippines
  • Sining Banwa Harong, Door 4 Ala Compound, Orange Street, Sunrise Subdivision, Cruzada, Legazpi City
  • Sitio Bololo, Brgy. Zone 5, Libon, Albay
Sining Banwa

Sining Banwa, a community-based multi-arts organization in Albay has called for donations to help survivors in Barangay Busay, Daraga, and other communities in the province.

Those interested can send monetary donations through the following accounts:


Social Work in the Typhoon Affected Areas of the Philippines: A Call to the International Social Work Community

Hosted by the Philippines Association of Social Workers, the Secretary-General of The International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), Dr. Rory Truell, visited the areas affected by Typhoon Yolanda last November. This is his account of his visit to one of the devastated/affected communities – Tacloban:

The peoples of the Philippines know about hardship, surviving poverty and resilience. The Pilipino social workers working in Tacloban also have these strengths and more. Not only do they endure the same conditions as other survivors – they are also assisting people everyday to restore their lives, debriefing the survivors of the trauma whose lives and families were utterly shattered in a single moment of time.

Listening to and watching the social workers, it is clear that they are having a positive impact because they involve the survivors in their own social development, facilitating them to work together to rebuild their confidence, purpose, and dignity – to take control over their own futures.

The social workers of Tacloban told our visiting delegation that their resilience and ability to continue practicing come both from their culture and their social work training. This particular group of social workers, however, are living in the almost totally devastated coastal fishing communities caused by Typhoon Yolanda last November, killing approximately 10,000 people. These social workers, who are also survivors, have worked everyday since November 8th, despite their own trauma and loss of family members, colleagues, houses, clothes and treasured positions. They have heroically put their communities first, seven days a week for two and a half months – and naturally they are now exhausted.

From the first moments of that catastrophic day, the local social workers played a critical role. One died on duty trying to help others to get to a safer place and another is still classified as missing. All the social workers themselves carry the immense pressure of trauma.

Describing what happened to himself on that day, a very senior social worker told us that he was trapped on the top of a two story building with the water raising so fast there was only a short time before he and others would be swept away. On a taller building on the opposite side of the road other people were able to toss a rope that could be secured between the buildings and with great difficulty the social worker supported people to wrap their arms and legs around the rope and pull themselves towards safety above the water streaming with bodies and debris below. The social worker was the last to leave the flooding two-story building and no one was able to assist him and stabilize the rope. He told us, ‘I was sure I was going to die and I shouted to the others on the in the building across the road, ‘Please just take my body home’. He did make it across, but how, he can’t remember. The deep lines and constant stiffing of his facial muscles to hold back the emotions echoed his next comment: ‘It’s still in my dreams and in my day’.

Another social worker told us that she was in one of the designated safety buildings. But unexpectedly it started to flood with the surge of water pushed up by the 315 kilometer winds. “People panicked”, she said. “They were trying to rush up the stairs as the water came up around them”. She paused and looked to the ground, recalling the vision, “They trampled over themselves, the children”. She threw herself out of a broken window into the gale and climbed a power pole with strength she didn’t know she had, and from the top she thought of her children who were at another part of the village while she watched the sheer horror below.

All the social workers of Tacloban had such stories and the surviving social workers have since worked seven days a week to support other survivors and their community despite their own trauma the loss of their loved ones. They have all had to make difficult choices between the needs of their own often traumatized families and the needs of the community.

At first, the social workers of Tacloban played a key role in assessing the damage to the community and advising rescue and medial teams. The focus was on getting food and supplies to people who had lost all material possessions and who were dazed and in despair. Now, their role is to provide authentication for the victims as their birth certificates and other paperwork were all destroyed.

This is critically important because authentication gives the survivors a legal status, and once the international agencies have left, such status could be the difference between surviving or not. ‘Having a legal document saying who they are helps restore their dignity’, one social worker told us.

On our visit, the faces of these social worker spoke the words they did not want to say: Expressions of trauma, holding back their own experiences and utter tiredness. ‘We have to stay strong, we have to keep doing our job’, a social work told us at the authentication desk with a long queue of waiting survivors. I asked her a personal question, knowing that it had the potential to disrupt her protective shield, but a question that would help us understand how we could help: ‘When do you have time to cry?’ She bought her hands to her face and, after a lengthy pause, she wiped her expression away, stood tall and said, ‘I cried once when my husband and children told me that I had been officially declared dead – but I can’t cry, we need to do this job’.

The situation of the social workers is a reality. There is no one else to do their jobs. The international agencies are focusing on rebuilding and supply of clothes, food and immediate shelter. The social workers attend to the social dynamics: the trauma, the grief and another issue that potentially could victimize the survivors further for the rest of their lives – trafficking.

Trafficking is the major issue for social workers throughout the Philippines. Mostly it involves children but adults are also smuggled out by boat, often through Malaysia, before they are sold to other traffickers that force the victims to work in prostitution or domestic labour in Europe and elsewhere. The severe disruption of the typhoon in affected communities leaves many more people vulnerable to traffickers.

Since the first days of the typhoon the social workers of Tacloban patrolled the ports and educated the port workers to report anything that looks suspicious. They also provided education to the surviving communities about taking care of the vulnerable children. Without social workers, no one would be paying attention to these tasks, so they feel the responsibility to report to work each day despite the pleas from there families to give attention to their own family trauma.

We asked the Tacloban social workers what they needed and how the international social work community could assist them.

They know that social workers throughout the world are not well resourced and that help can only be limited. One social worker replied: ‘Our fear is that when the UN and international agencies leave, they might have cleaned up the roads but not the pain and the economy’.

The international social work community cannot provide funds to assist the survivors to move from living under plastic sheets and on top of the rubble that still holds the bodies of the missing. We cannot rebuild the schools so that the children can piece together normal lives. These are the responsibilities of governments and the role of the social workers is to advocate with and on behalf of the affected peoples on how such money should be deployed. But there is still the reality that social workers in the typhoon-affected areas are not well supported by an overstretched government. The international social work community CAN respond by supporting their colleagues to perform their work safely and without such sacrifice to their own families.

Last November, IFSW and the Philippians Association of Social Workers called for support from IFSW members. Immediately the IFSW member organisations in Japan and others responded with donations. I mention Japan as it was only two years ago that they suffered the horrific affects of a tsunami. Social workers from around the world responded then by donating what funds they could. Now the Japanese social workers are supporting their counterparts in the Philippines. This is a demonstration of social work solidarity at it highest and IFSW will honour those contributors at forthcoming General Meetings.

But there is still more to be done in Tacloban and in other areas of the Philippines devastated by the typhoon. The social workers are ensuring that our global professional values of ‘capacity building’ and ‘community involvement in the decision making’ are upheld and translated into action. The social workers are halting a new tide of trafficking survivors, but they need our support.

The Philippine Association of Social Workers has put together a package of support that will provide some immediate relief to the social workers at the front line:

1 The first priority is to provide immediate debriefing and support for the social workers of Tacloban and other affected areas. This involves other Philippine social workers travelling to Tacloban and creating a safe space for the traumatized social workers to tell their stories and externalize their trauma in a controlled environment. To piece together their stories of shock, pain, loss, survival and future plans.

2 The second part of the package is to arrange for social workers from other areas within the Philippines to stand-in for the social workers in Tacloban and other affected areas, allowing them to take a break form their professional service and to spend time with their families and to grieve themselves.

3 Part three involves arranging financial support for recreation breaks for the Tacloban and other affected social workers. Such breaks need to be away from the devastated areas, allowing the social worker and her/his family to find space to recuperate so that they can again face the challenges of rebuilding their own home communities with real energy.

4 The fourth aspect of this package is to provide support and debriefing to the families of the affected social workers. All too often family members struggle to understand why their mother or wife is looking after others when their own family is in distress. It also a problem that family members of social workers tend not seek the services of other social workers. Support of the families of frontline social workers will enable them to continue their critical work.

Filipino social workers from the non-affected areas have embraced this package and are willing to volunteer as debriefers to carry out the authentication work or any other duties required. But they also have resource shortages and the costs of the flight or boat trips to Tacloban cannot be found easily from the salaries of social workers who are working in an economically deprived situation.

Support from the international social work community is needed. Donations from IFSW member organizations will help stop the burnout of colleagues who are heroically supporting survivors.

To make a donation – big or small – please donate directly to the Philippine Association of Social Workers PASW and they will make sure your all of your donation goes to fund the 4 point package described above. Messages of support can also be sent directly to the PASW email: [email protected]

Account Name : Philippine Association of Social Workers, Inc.
Bank : Bank of the Philippine Island
Branch : UP Ayala Land Techno Hub Banch
Postal Addess : UP Ayala Land Techno Hub, Commonwealth Avenue, Quezon City, 1101, Philippines
Account Number : 2284-1028-03
SWIFT Code : BOPIPHMM

It is wonderful to be a part of an international social work family. Two years ago it was Japan, now it is the Philippines. As climate problems grow, we now know we can look after each other. As social workers, we don’t just see the statistics of the 10,000 who died. We see human stories and the effects upon the next generation – and we can see our role as humanitarians and defenders of human rights.

To see more information and photos of the Typhoon affected areas follow Rory Truell’s updates on his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rory.truell.9

See also this article in The Guardian newspaper online.

Keywords: aid, rebuilding communities Region: Asia and Pacific Language: English


Watch the video: Βοήθεια για τα παιδιά στις Φιλιππίνες Τυφώνας Χαϊγιάν (August 2022).