New recipes

Stir Fry BBQ Pork Noodles recipe

Stir Fry BBQ Pork Noodles recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Pasta
  • Pasta types
  • Noodles

A delicious stir-fried noodle dish. Enjoy as a substantial lunch or dinner.


Quebec, Canada

7 people made this

IngredientsServes: 3 - 4 people

  • 250g dried spaghetti
  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 1/4 head cabbage, finely sliced
  • 1 medium onion, finely sliced
  • 4 spring onions, chopped into 2.5cm pieces
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 450g Chinese BBQ pork (char siu), sliced
  • Sauce
  • 3 tablespoons Japanese soy sauce (tamari)
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 dessertspoon sugar

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:25min

  1. Cook the spaghetti in salted boiling water until al-dente, around 8-10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  2. Heat a large frying pan with 1 tablespoon oil over high heat. Saute the garlic until fragrant, 2-3 minutes. Add and saute the cabbage, onion and spring onions with salt until soft, 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add the sliced pork, spaghetti, Japanese soy sauce, oyster sauce and sugar. Stir well to mix. Serve.

Ingredients

Chinese BBQ pork (char siu) can be purchased in Chinese restaurants.
Japanese soy sauce (tamari) can be purchased in Chinese/Oriental speciality stores.

See it on my blog

Recently viewed

Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(0)

Reviews in English (0)


Recipe Summary

  • 5 dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 12 ounces fresh Chinese noodles or linguine
  • ¼ cup chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 ½ teaspoons unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese chile-garlic sauce
  • 1 pinch sugar
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon ginger, minced
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced, plus more for garnish
  • ½ pound leftover Asian-Brined Pork Loin or other roast pork, cut into thin strips
  • Sliced fresh hot red chiles, for garnish

In a microwave-safe bowl, cover the shiitake with water and microwave at high power for 2 minutes. Let stand until plump, about 10 minutes. Drain, rinse and pat dry. Thinly slice the mushrooms.

In a saucepan of boiling water, cook the noodles until al dente, 3 minutes drain and rinse the noodles. In a bowl, combine the broth, soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, chile-garlic sauce and sugar.

In a large nonstick skillet, heat the vegetable oil. Add the ginger and shiitake and cook over high heat, stirring, for 3 minutes. Add the noodles and scallions and stir-fry until lightly browned, 5 minutes. Add the pork and sauce and cook over moderate heat, tossing until the sauce is absorbed, 3 minutes. Transfer the noodles to a platter, garnish with scallions and chiles and serve.


What cut of pork is best for a stir fry?

I prefer to use a pork tenderloin, also known as pork fillet or pork tender. It&rsquos easy to cut and stays tender once cooked. It can easily dry out too though, so a marinade is perfect here. Do not confuse pork tenderloin with pork loin. Pork loin is a wider, larger cut of pork that you can actually cut into steaks. This type of cut works better for slow roasting and grilling.

You can use boneless pork chops as well. They are also low in fat and can be used interchangeably in this recipe. Because they are so lean, a marinade/brine/sauce situation is highly recommended &ndash and obviously we have one here! Further reading: Different kinds of pork chops.


Speedy Stir-Fry Pork Noodles

It’s no secret that we’re absolutely obsessed with pork. Being Cantonese gals through-and-through, we grew up eating lots of pork and revering celebratory dishes like barbecue char siu pork and crispy five-spiced pork belly. We also love the way that pork plays a starring role on dim sum menus, from open-topped siu mai dumplings to fluffy roast pork buns.

With such a tasty list of special and indulgent pork dishes, you’d be forgiven for thinking that we reserve pork for banqueting and special occasions – the kind of thing that we only have when we eat out or have loads of time to cook. But this couldn’t be further from the truth! In fact, we reckon that pork is just as brilliant when you want to rustle up quick and tasty midweek meals.

Whenever we cook with pork during the week we tend to reach for a succulent, lean and quick-to-cook cut like pork loin medallions. They’re really easy to use and respond well to our quick Cantonese-style marinade for extra tenderness and flavour. You can find loin medallions in most supermarkets nowadays, but if you’re having trouble you can simply pick up pork steaks and trim off the fat.

To show you guys how easy it is to cook with pork medallions, we recently had a fun day teaching the super lovely Sarah from Taming Twins how to make our speedy stir-fry pork noodles. With just a handful of ingredients, including loads of crunchy and colourful veg, these noodles are a healthy and comforting midweek option that goes from wok to dinner table in a matter of moments. They also make for a nice change from your bog-standard chicken stir-fry, and we guarantee they’ll be a hit with the whole family.

Watch the video below and tab across to get all the recipe details!

For more pork recipe inspiration, visit lovepork.co.uk/discover

4 pork loin medallions, cut into strips
250g dried medium egg noodles
2 tbsp vegetable oil
3 garlic cloves, diced
2 tbsp diced ginger
150g mangetout
2 red peppers, sliced
(a lternatively, you can use stir fry vegetables of your choice or a pre-pack vegetable stir fry mix)
40g crushed peanuts

For the marinade
2 tsp light soy sauce
¼ tsp ground white pepper
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tbsp cornflour
3 tbsp water

For the sauce mix
2½ tbsp oyster sauce
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
180ml water

4 pork loin medallions, cut into strips
250g dried medium egg noodles
2 tbsp vegetable oil
3 garlic cloves, diced
2 tbsp diced ginger
150g mangetout
2 red peppers, sliced
(a lternatively, you can use stir fry vegetables of your choice or a pre-pack vegetable stir fry mix)
40g crushed peanuts

For the marinade
2 tsp light soy sauce
¼ tsp ground white pepper
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tbsp cornflour
3 tbsp water

For the sauce mix
2½ tbsp oyster sauce
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
180ml water

This is a paid partnership with Love Pork. Find out more at lovepork.co.uk.

It’s no secret that we’re absolutely obsessed with pork. Being Cantonese gals through-and-through, we grew up eating lots of pork and revering celebratory dishes like barbecue char siu pork and crispy five-spiced pork belly. We also love the way that pork plays a starring role on dim sum menus, from open-topped siu mai dumplings to fluffy roast pork buns.

With such a tasty list of special and indulgent pork dishes, you’d be forgiven for thinking that we reserve pork for banqueting and special occasions – the kind of thing that we only have when we eat out or have loads of time to cook. But this couldn’t be further from the truth! In fact, we reckon that pork is just as brilliant when you want to rustle up quick and tasty midweek meals.

Whenever we cook with pork during the week we tend to reach for a succulent, lean and quick-to-cook cut like pork loin medallions. They’re really easy to use and respond well to our quick Cantonese-style marinade for extra tenderness and flavour. You can find loin medallions in most supermarkets nowadays, but if you’re having trouble you can simply pick up pork steaks and trim off the fat.

To show you guys how easy it is to cook with pork medallions, we recently had a fun day teaching the super lovely Sarah from Taming Twins how to make our speedy stir-fry pork noodles. With just a handful of ingredients, including loads of crunchy and colourful veg, these noodles are a healthy and comforting midweek option that goes from wok to dinner table in a matter of moments. They also make for a nice change from your bog-standard chicken stir-fry, and we guarantee they’ll be a hit with the whole family.


A blank canvas for Chinese Stir Fry Noodles

I rarely use a recipe for stir fry noodles I make on a day to day basis, because after making it hundreds (and hundreds!) of times, the “formula” is embedded deep in me which means I can throw one together using virtually any ingredients. And I swear, I’ve never had a disaster failure. Some are better than others, and I’ve experimented with stir frying some strange ingredients (umm…parsnip in stir fries is weird), but overall it’s always tasty and I happily scoff down a large bowl and go back for seconds.

So in this post I’m sharing a guide for how to “build your own” Chinese stir fry noodles using my Real Chinese All Purpose Stir Fry Sauce. The “formula” is really simple – this is for 1 serving:

1 1/2 cups noodles + 1/2 cup protein + 2 to 3 cups (packed) vegetables* + 2 tbsp Real Chinese All Purpose Stir Fry Sauce + 1/4 cup water + Optional Add Ons (Base Flavour and Additional Flavourings)

* I love having loads of vegetables. But really it depends on your personal taste, and the “normal” amount tends to be 2 cups per serving (but pack the cup. Pack it good! Veggies are good for you!)

Read on below for guidance on each of these components, plus I’ve included a printable recipe at the bottom summarising this post.

Noodles – you can use any noodles you want, dried or fresh, except vermicelli (too thin for this sauce) and the egg noodles for soups (the ones that come in the packet coated with cornflour/cornstarch – it makes the stir fry too thick and gluggy). Cook the dried noodles according to the packet instructions. If using dried rice noodles, I like to “cook” them simply by pouring over plenty of boiling water and leaving them in a bowl for 5 minutes or so.

As with most recipes, it’s better to use fresh rather than dried noodles. My favourite fresh noodles to stir fry is hokkien noodles – I can find them fresh in pretty much any supermarket, and it’s a really versatile noodle – I use it in soups, and you can make stir fries for pretty much any Asian cuisine (Thai, Japanese, Malaysian, Singaporean). However, fresh rice noodles are not readily available in supermarkets here in Sydney, you have to get them from Asian stores, so I usually make this with dried rice noodles (which are readily available – plus they are way cheaper than fresh noodles!).

Protein – use whatever proteins you want, meat, shrimp or tofu. For meat, slice it against the grain. Slice the meat thinly so it cooks quickly – 1/4″ / 0.5cm slices.


  • 200g pkt egg noodles
  • 1 tbsp peanut oil
  • 500g Coles Australian Pork Mince
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 tsp finely grated ginger
  • 2 long red chillies, thinly sliced
  • 227g can water chestnut slices, rinsed, drained
  • 400g pkt Coles Supreme Vegetable Mix
  • 1/3 cup (95g) oyster sauce
  • 1/4 cup (35g) roasted peanuts, chopped
  • Thinly sliced long red chilli, extra, to serve
  • Coriander leaves, to serve
  • Lime wedges, to serve

STEP 1

Cook the noodles following packet directions. Drain.

STEP 2

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a wok or large frying pan over high heat. Add the mince and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon to break up any lumps, for 5 mins or until cooked through.

STEP 3

Add the garlic, ginger, chilli, water chestnut and vegetable mix. Cook, stirring, for 2 mins or until vegetables are wilted. Add the oyster sauce and noodles and cook, stirring, until well combined and heated through.

STEP 4

Sprinkle the stir-fry with peanut, extra chilli and coriander. Serve with the lime wedges.

Check ingredient labels to make sure they meet your specific dietary requirements and always consult a health professional before changing your diet.


Ingredients

    • 12 ounces, thin dried Chinese egg noodles
    • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  1. sauce
    • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons oyster sauce
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons honey
    • 1 tablespoon peanut or vegetable oil
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic
    • 1 teaspoon minced or grated fresh ginger
    • 3 scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths
    • 4 or 5 fresh shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
    • 1/2 pound Chinese barbecued pork, store-bought or homemade, cut into small, bite-sized pieces

Ingredients

This recipe calls for pork butt or shoulder, which I think is important. You want the extra fattiness of the pork to add flavor to your pork and keep it from drying out.

Vermicelli noodles are noodles made out of rice flour commonly used in Vietnamese dishes. Most grocery stores carry them now, but if you can't find them you can buy them HERE on Amazon (affiliate link).

You'll also want to stock up on fresh herbs such as mint, basil and cilantro. The fresh herbs complement the strong flavor and richness of the pork. These Vietnamese Pickled Vegetables are another good serving option.

The nuoc cham is an important part of this dish. You're really going to want to make sure you have it. It's very easy to make your own, and it will last FOREVER in the fridge.

The rest of the ingredients are listed in the recipe card at the bottom of this post.


Where to Get Chinese Roast Pork

If you are lucky enough to have a local Asian grocery store or restaurant that sells fresh BBQ roast pork, then you have the convenient luxury of buying prepared roast pork. However, good quality fresh char siu can be quite pricey, and, for most people, it’s not readily available nearby.

The solution: make your own batch of Chinese roast pork at home using our Char Siu recipe.

If you haven’t yet tried making roast pork in your oven at home, you’re missing out! Give it a try, or if you consider yourself a master of the grilling arts, you can try your hand at our char siu recipe on the grill! Better yet, you can make a big batch and set some aside to freeze for another day. It thaws out nicely for making this stir-fry, or as an add-in for noodle soups!


Nadia Lim's quick and easy pork and vegetable noodle stir-fry

Make this recipe your own by mixing up the mince. It will be just as delicious with chicken or turkey mince. Use whatever stir-fry vegetables you have in your fridge. Mung bean sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, beans and snow peas would all work! Also feel free to use your favourite noodles, whether they be rice noodles or fresh egg noodles.

PORK AND VEGETABLE NOODLE STIR-FRY
Serves 4

Pork and vegetable noodles:
1 tablespoon oil
450g pork mince
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons finely grated ginger
1 tablespoon oil
2 spring onions, white part only, thinly sliced (reserve green part to garnish)
2 baby bok choy, finely shredded
2 carrots, peeled, cut into thin matchsticks or grated
1 capsicum, core and seeds removed and thinly sliced
350g fresh noodles (e.g. Singapore noodles, egg noodles, udon etc)

Stir-fry sauce:
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon sweet chilli sauce
¼ cup water
1 tablespoon runny honey
1 teaspoon cornflour

To serve:
1 tablespoon sweet chilli sauce
2 spring onions, green part only, thinly sliced
¼ cup chopped roasted peanuts
2 tablespoons chopped coriander
1 lemon, cut into wedges

Bring a full kettle to the boil.

Heat the oil in a large wok or frying pan (preferably non-stick) over high heat. Cook the pork, garlic and ginger with a pinch of salt for about 6 minutes until well browned and just cooked through, breaking the mince up with wooden spoon or fork as it cooks. Set aside in a large bowl. Keep the pan on the heat.

Add the second measure of oil to the wok/pan, add the spring onion (white part), bok choy, carrots and capsicum and stir-fry for about 2 minutes or until the bok choy begins to wilt. Set aside in a bowl with the pork. Combine all the stir-fry sauce ingredients in a small bowl.

Pour boiling water over the noodles, gently separate the strands using a fork then drain well immediately (or cook according to packet instructions). Using the same pan over medium heat, add the noodles and stir-fry sauce. Stir-fry for 1 minute to coat the noodles in the sauce. Return the pork and vegetables to the pan and toss until heated through, about 1 minute.

To serve, divide the pork and vegetable noodles among bowls, drizzle over a little sweet chilli sauce, garnish with spring onion, peanuts, coriander and a squeeze of lemon juice.



Comments:

  1. Ryan

    Agree, very good information

  2. Ramzi

    I agree this topic is already so boring!

  3. Wayne

    the good result will turn out

  4. Botolff

    In my opinion, they are wrong. We need to discuss. Write to me in PM, it talks to you.

  5. Benecroft

    I think he is wrong. I'm sure.

  6. Arabar

    It will be the last drop.



Write a message