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Word of Mouth: Chef Suvir Saran's New York

Word of Mouth: Chef Suvir Saran's New York



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Brunch: Balthazar

Fancy: Asiate at night for dinner, enjoying views of Central Park.

Best Value: Moustache on Bedford Street

Bar Scene/Drinks: Mandarin Oriental Hotel

Business Lunch: Four Seasons Restaurant with Julian Niccolini when planning my menu.

Burger: Shake Shack

Pizza: Di Fara in Brooklyn, Dominic is the best!

Sandwich: 'ino on Bedford Street, Jason Denton and his team are sandwich geniuses.

Food Truck: Big Gay Ice Cream Truck

Regional: Vatan for Gujarati Vegetarian Fare from India

Hidden Gem: Tanoreen in Brooklyn for the BEST Middle Eastern and Palestinian Food in New York City.

Mexican/Latin American: Cucharamama, Hoboken, Maricel Presilla is the Queen of Latin Cuisine in my world.

Japanese: Megu Midtown for sushi, see chef Nori

Spanish/Tapas: Boqueria

Thai/Southeast Asian: SriPraPhai in Queens

Wine List: Babbo

Chinese: Chinatown Brasserie

Seafood: Le Bernardin

Steak: Peter Luger

Italian: Salumeria Rosi

Barbecue: Hill Country

Desserts: Spot Dessert Bar

Indian: Vatan

Vegetarian: At home.

Wild Card: Momofuku


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Category Archives: Uncategorized

Since 2008, when Smithsonian’s Indian American Heritage Project began, we’ve been hearing from Indian Americans all over the United States about their family connections to the Smithsonian. Here’s a photograph and anecdote from Khalid Maricar. Do you have a family connection to the Smithsonian? Tell us about it.

Mr P.M.K Syed Mohammed Maricar (left), accompanied by his business partners, admiring an exceptional star sapphire, c. 1958.

In the early 1950s, my grandfather, Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar, presented “The Star of Asia,” a large, 330-carat cabochon-cut star sapphire to the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The gem was one of many acquired as he travelled from a small coastal town in South India to the United States.

Mr. PMK Syed Mohamed Maricar continued his travels across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in 1958, where he ran, with several English business partners, a consignment house for gem merchants from Sri Lanka, India and Burma.

Specializing in fine Ceylon Sapphires, Burmese rubies and Colombian emeralds, the Maricar’s trade links allowed them to supply leading retailers and workshops in the day throughout the UK, Europe and US.

Today, the company in its third-generation of dealing. Mr. Syed Ahmed Maricar and his sons Mr. Hassan Maricar and Mr. Khalid Maricar continue the family tradition of buying and selling the finest gems and jewels to retailers and dealers worldwide.


Watch the video: Exploring Indian Cuisine (August 2022).