New recipes

A Lesson in How to Make Bitters

A Lesson in How to Make Bitters


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

You almost hate to hear it: Making your own bitters at home? Yeah, it's actually not that difficult.

Because there's no excuse now — and you start to think, how could I not have been doing this all along? Ideas for black cherry-ginger, or coffee bean-cocoa nib bitters rush in.

If you're tapped in to the cocktail zeitgeist, odds are you already have bitters on the brain. (If you're not, here's what you need to know: Classic cocktails? Having a major moment. Housemade behind-the-bar ingredients? Huge. Bitters? Über retro-chic.) So you can imagine the on-trend factor of housemade bitters, and the cocktails made with them.

"They're a kind of late-blooming extension of the classic cocktail trend that peaked about five years ago, and the more widespread grassroots, farm-to-table phenomenon that's taken place in the industry more recently," explains Dan Carlson, bartender at New York restaurant Saul. Bitters, essentially a highly concentrated mixture of spirits and aromatic ingredients, act as "a kind of nuanced seasoning that galvanizes the flavor profile of a cocktail recipe." And while they have long since played a role in the craft of making cocktails — the still widely popular brand Angostura dates back to 1824 — the resurgence of the classic cocktail has pushed bitters out of the old folks' home and given them a whole new wardrobe at that.

At Saul, and its sister establishment The Vanderbilt, you'll find housemade bitters without boundaries: Saigon cinnamon and walnut; strawberry and Indian fennel. "When you make your own bitters you have the freedom to choose what kind of flavor combinations you'd like to anchor your recipes around. You come to respect each ingredient more fully and understand how they can act in harmony and discord with others," Dan remarks.

OK, so let's backtrack for a second. Because "not that difficult" is not to say that there isn't still some work involved — think of making your own bitters as a sort of science project for the card-carrying cocktail geek. Is sourcing ingredients like quassia bark and gentian going to be a bit of a challenge? Sure. But consider this: One "starter" batch of bitters could easily last the average home bartender a year.

You just need to go in knowing that it's going to require some patience, and accept that it might not work out exactly as you anticipated. As Dan is quick to note, "It might sound silly, but I think you need to remind yourself that you're doing this because it's fun, and there is an element of risk involved."

Click here for the Lesson in How to Make Bitters Slideshow.

Click here for the Saigon Cinnamon & Walnut Bitters recipe.

Click here for the Highland Sage cocktail recipe.


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!


How to Make a Martini

James Bond certainly put the martini on the cultural map. No matter which actor was playing the secret agent, Bond's drink of choice often made a cameo and was always &ldquoshaken, not stirred.&rdquo But the truth is, the martini is a sophisticated classic in its own right&mdasheven without 007. It&rsquos also one of the most variable cocktails out there. Shaken or stirred? Vodka or gin? Should it be garnished with a lemon twist or do you prefer olives or cocktail onions? Would you like it &ldquodirty&rdquo with a little olive juice? Do you prefer a fruity version with apple liqueur? Or do you want to go rogue with an espresso or chocolate martini? The options are endless! If you&rsquore channeling your inner Pioneer Woman, you might want to mix up a Butterfly Martini made with gin, St Germain, Crème de Violette, and hibiscus bitters&mdashit&rsquos on the menu at Ree's pizzeria, P-Town Pizza!

But first, let's start with how to make a martini&mdashyou don't need to have a well-stocked bar to mix one up. Experiment a little to find out how you like your drink. And no matter what martini path you choose, be sure to serve your cocktail in a chilled glass to keep it nice and cold&mdashit makes all the difference.

Is a classic martini made with vodka or gin?

A classic martini is made with gin. But because the liquor has a strong botanical flavor, many people prefer to use vodka&mdashit&rsquos more neutral. You can't go wrong either way! Just keep in mind that a martini is basically straight gin or vodka, so use a brand you really like.

What about dry vermouth?

Other than gin or vodka, the only other alcohol in a classic martini is a hint of dry vermouth, which is a fortified wine. Like regular wine, vermouth is available in both red and white&mdashpick white vermouth (or blanco, bianco or blanc, depending on what country it comes from) for a martini. You&rsquoll only need a little bit of vermouth for a martini be sure to refrigerate the opened bottle or, like wine, it will oxidize and turn into vinegar. If you want your cocktail &ldquobone dry,&rdquo rinse your glass with vermouth instead of mixing it into the cocktail: Pour a small splash into a chilled glass, swirl it around, and dump it out before pouring in the vodka or gin. (If you&rsquore feeling fancy, you can mist the vermouth into the glass with a spray bottle like some bartenders do!) The classic ratio is 1 part vermouth to 6 or 7 parts gin or vodka, but some people like their martinis "wet," which means equal parts vermouth and gin or vodka.

Should a classic martini be shaken or stirred?

Purists would say that a classic martini that only contains alcohol (no extras like juice or olive brine) should be stirred, not shaken (sorry, 007!). Combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and stir for about 30 seconds, then strain. (This technique is often used with gin-based martinis, since some people feel that gin can release too many of its botanical flavors if shaken.) Many people like to shake their martini to get it super cold, though&mdashit&rsquos purely a personal preference. To shake, combine the ingredients in a shaker with ice and vigorously shake for about 10 seconds before straining the drink into the glass.

What should I use to garnish my martini?

Some people like their martini &ldquowith a twist,&rdquo which means that you squeeze the back of a wide strip of lemon zest to release the oils into the glass, then rub the peel around the rim. You can even add the peel to the drink for a stronger citrus flavor. You can also garnish with pearl onions for a &ldquoGibson&rdquo or add a toothpick of olives&mdashusually plain green ones, although some people like garlic or blue cheese-stuffed ones in their glass. If you&rsquore going the olive route and want your drink to have some olive juice in it, ask for it to be &ldquodirty,&rdquo &ldquoextra dirty&rdquo or even &ldquofilthy,&rdquo depending on how much brine you want.

Once you know how to make a classic martini, play around a little to create your own perfect recipe!